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Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: POLIN Museum

Jews and Others: Ethnic Relations in Eastern and Central Europe from 1917 and Onwards

Deadline: 30-04-2017
Location: Warsaw, Poland

Description

Jews and Others: Ethnic Relations in Eastern and Central Europe from 1917 and Onwards

International Conference at POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

Warsaw, Poland
2-4 October 2017

The Russian revolutions of 1917 played a key role in defining the 20th century by virtue of the processes they launched, the entities they helped create and
the reactions they triggered. The legacies of these transformative events and their aftermath, not least the collapse of empires and the birth of nation-states, still reverberate in many ways throughout Eastern and Central Europe.
This conference, “Jews and Others: Ethnic Relations in Eastern and Central Europe from 1917 and Onwards,” to be held at the POLIN Museum is the second of a three-part series. The 1rst stage, “The Hundred-Year Legacy of the Russian Revolution and the World Today: How the Revolution Divided, Unied, and Shaped a Continent,” is being held at the Kennan Institute (Wilson Center) in Washington, D.C. on April 3-5, 2017. The nal conference is scheduled for December 2017 at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
With the NADAV Foundation’s support, POLIN Museum, the Nevzlin Center, and the Kennan Institute are inviting presentations from Central and Eastern Europe scholars (particularly from Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary) aimed at reassessing the profound implications of the events of 1917-1918
through a regional lens. While focusing on the Jewish experience, the participants will revisit the shared past of many nationalities throughout this area. The objective of this scholarly platform is to spark new conversations on the meaning of the nation-state and its narratives. Prevalent themes of our sessions will include radical change, war and violence. What is more, we will explore how these phenomena have found expression in collective memories, migration, integration, and other socio-cultural developments.
To this end, the organizers invite proposals for twenty-minute papers that address, inter alia, the following forces that the Russian revolutions set in motion throughout Central and Eastern Europe:
• Co-existence of Jews and non-Jews before and after the wars: between pragmatic alliances and anti-Semitism.
• Jews and hegemonic national groups – allegiance and estrangement, Jewish vectors of assimilation and acculturation.
• Gender in the aftermath of 1917-1918: Jewish and non-Jewish facets.
• Jewish chapters, understated or otherwise, of current national narratives and the historical memory of these fateful years.
All proposals should constitute original, wide-ranging, multifaceted research that has yet to be presented in any academic forum. Written proposals of 200-300 words and a brief CV are to be sent to: conference1917@polin.pl no later than April 30, 2017. Travel expenses, including accommodations in Warsaw, will be covered by the
organizers. The conference organizers reserve the right to publish proceedings from the conference.

Partners
Nevzlin Center, Kennan Institute. Sponsored by the NADAV Foundation, Israel

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-04-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: POLIN Museum
E-mail: conference1917@polin.pl
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Salem State University Center for Holocaust and Ge

Emerging Consequences-A Two-Day Symposium on Aesthetics in the Aftermath of Atrocity

Deadline: 30-04-2017
Location: Salem, Massachusetts , US

Description

Emerging Consequences-A Two-Day Symposium on Aesthetics in the Aftermath of Atrocity

November 3-4, 2017
“The darkening of the world makes the irrationality of art rational: radically darkened art.”  - Theodor Adorno

What emerges in the aftermath of war? What are the aesthetic consequences that arise in the wake of mass atrocity? What impact do these consequences have on our understanding of generic categories? Working on these questions in the 21st century necessitates new ways of imaginatively representing trauma and conflict, as well as new ways of making sense of these representations. Atrocities--The Holocaust, The Balkan Wars, The Rwandan Genocide, the Cambodian Killing Fields, and the ongoing crisis of Syria--constitute an urgent appeal for the creation of a new artistic vocabulary, including a theoretical reevaluation of generic categories (such as media studies, literature, music) and their limits and possibilities. These newly imagined relationships reconfigure the way we think about aesthetics, and engender an increased and invigorated fluidity among established disciplinary structures.  
The Salem State University Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies in Massachusetts invites proposals for an interdisciplinary symposium that will engage with contemporary discourses produced about aesthetics and representation in the aftermath of war, genocide and mass atrocity. We seek papers that focus on specific forms of post conflict representation, as well as those that rigorously examine the ways in which the discourse of representation itself is shaped and reconfigured by these new and disruptive forms. Papers are encouraged from scholars at the doctoral and post-doctoral level in the Humanities, the Fine Arts, and the Social Sciences. 

Papers will draw from specific areas of study such as: prose fiction/poetry; film/photography; visual art; performance art; museum studies/new materialism, and mixed media studies. 

The keynote address will be given by Robert Eaglestone, PhD (Royal Holloway, University of London). 

Robert Eaglestone is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London, and was Deputy Director of the Holocaust Research Institute there. He works on contemporary literature and literary theory, contemporary philosophy and on Holocaust and Genocide studies. He is the author of six books including The Holocaust and the Postmodern (Oxford 2004), Studying Literature (Routledge 2016) and The Broken Voice: Reading Post-Holocaust Literature (Oxford 2017) and the editor or co-editor of seven books more, including Teaching Holocaust Literature and Film (Palgrave 2008) and The Future of Trauma Theory (Routledge 2013). He is the Series Editor of Routledge Critical Thinkers and his work has been translated into five languages and he has spoken widely at universities and conferences in the UK, the USA and Europe. In 2014 he won a National Teaching Fellowship Award.

Please submit a 250 word abstract to chgsconference@salemstate.edu by Monday, April 30th, 2017. Submissions should include your full name, position/rank, university affiliation, e-mail address, and short bio (about 150 words). There is no symposium fee. There is limited travel funding; please alert us of your needs in your proposal (first priority will be given to graduate students from outside of the US).

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-04-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Catherine S Hennessey
E-mail: ctr_chennessey@salemstate.edu
Website: http://www.salemstate.edu/28124.php?id=5346
Project / event type: workshops
Organiser: Maria Pohn-Lauggas, Camilo Molina, Christoph Reinp

Marie Jahoda Summer School of Sociology: Exile and Memory – Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Deadline: 30-04-2017
Location: Institute for Sociology, University of Vienna

Description

In 2017 Marie Jahoda Summer School invites young scholars working on the issue of exile and memory. The aim of the summer school is to establish an environment for intellectually open and interdisciplinary exchange of research projects. Research may be related to historical experiences of exile or to forms and types of exile in current contexts of forced migration. We encourage in particular projects focusing on individual or collective forms and practices of doing memory and its social and institutional conditions. This includes scientific work on artistic forms of exile-related ‘memory work’, research on group-specific and private memory practices and questions of intergenerational transmission, projects on institutional-ised remembrance practices carried out in conflicting fields of tension with dominant forms of memory and discourse (associations, archives, museums), and research on marginalised, informal and invisible experiences of exile and memory which may provide access to counter memories.

The summer school offers seminars and lectures, field trips and workshops with researchers and practitioners. The faculty brings together an international and multi-disciplinary faculty of distinguished scholars: Prof. Marianne Hirsch (Columbia University, NYC), Prof. Smain Laacher (Université de Strasbourg), Dr. Breda Gray (University of Limerick), Dr. Marie Rodet (SOAS University of London), Prof. András Kovács (Central European University, Budapest).

The Marie Jahoda Summer School is open to 22 young scholars, advanced master students, PhD-candidates and early stage researchers from humanities and social sciences. The participating PhD students are required to present their research (PhD) projects and receive feedback from faculty members.

Applicants shall submit a description of their research/dissertation project (max. 2 pages) and a CV (max. 1 page) by 30 April 2017. The applicants will be informed of the faculty’s decision by 20 May 2017. Accepted papers need to be submitted by 15 August 2017 (maximum 7000 words).

The fee payable to those attending will be 140 Euro, and it includes the Summer School Dinner. Travel and accommodation costs have to be covered by the applicants. If low budget accommodation is needed, please contact the organisers. A total of 6 ECTS points are awarded for the participation.

For more detailed information please consult the Marie Jahoda Summer School website

Partners
National Fund of the Republic of Austria for Victims of National Socialism, Österreichische Forschungsgemeinschaft, Zukunftsfonds der Republik Österreich, Wien Kultur (MA 7), Wien Museum

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-04-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Camilo Molina
E-mail: mariejahoda.summerschool@univie.ac.at
Phone: +43-1-4277-49235
Website: https://www.soz.univie.ac.at/marie-jahoda-summer-school-2017/
Project / event type: workshops
Organiser: POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

Victims of the Holocaust and Nazi Crimes: New Resources for Polish and East European Scholars

Deadline: 30-04-2017
Location: Warsaw, Poland

Description

Research Workshop

Victims of the Holocaust and Nazi Crimes: New Resources for Polish and East European Scholars

Monday-Friday
4 – 8 September 2017

 
 	 	 
 	
The Institute of National Remembrance (IPN), The International Tracing Service (ITS), POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies (USHMM) are pleased to welcome applications for a research workshop entitled Victims of the Holocaust and Nazi Crimes: New Resources for Polish and East European Scholars. This workshop is scheduled for 4 – 8 September 2017 and will take place at POLIN Museum and the Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) in Warsaw.

This research workshop is a continuation of the inaugural Warsaw-based Seminar on the International Tracing Service Digital Archive for Polish Scholars launched in September 2016. This research workshop seeks to provide Polish and east European scholars with research opportunities in the holdings of the ITS digital archive and other IPN holdings related to World War II, as well as resources holdings accessible at POLIN, including genealogical databases at its Resource Center. In daily morning sessions, workshop leaders from the staff of the IPN, ITS, POLIN, USC Shoah Foundation and USHMM will guide participants through World War II related holdings. Each afternoon, worshop participants will have time to conduct research in small group settings on a particular research topic. These include but are not limited to: the experiences of Polish Jews and non-Jews, Polish forced labor on German soil, medical experiments on Polish inmates in German concentration camps, repatriates and emigrants from Poland, and many other topics. On the final day of the research workshop, each working group will present their research results and potential future directions of continued research.

Applications are welcome from Polish and east European scholars affiliated with universities and institutions in Poland and east Europe in all relevant academic disciplines, including anthropology, archeology, art history, geography, film studies, history, Jewish studies, law, literature, material culture, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, comparative genocide studies, and others. Polish and east European scholars who are Ph.D. students, post-doctoral researchers, and senior researchers will all be considered. Applicants must be affiliated with an academic or research institution. Faculty between appointments will also be considered. No more than two representatives from a single academic institution will be selected.

How to Apply

Applications may be submitted in English or Polish and should include:

A letter of recommendation from the applicant’s department chair, dean, or dissertation advisor (in the case of Ph.D. Candidates) addressing the applicant’s scholarship;
A letter of interest by the applicant;
A current curriculum vitae addressing the applicant’s qualifications, including previous coursework, projects, teaching, and publications.
Please submit all application materials via mail, or email attachment to:

POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews POLIN Resource Center 
6 Anielewicza St. 
00-157 Warszawa 
Poland 
e-mail: resourcecenter@polin.pl

Recommenders must submit signed letters on their institution’s letterhead under separate cover. Applications and supporting materials must be received by 30 April 30 2017. Selected participants will be notified by early June.

The organizers will cover the cost of lodging and meals for the seminar’s duration. Participants’ home institutions are expected to cover the cost of travel and ground transportation, to be booked by the participants themselves. Participants are required to attend the full duration of the workshop. The workshop is planned to end on 8 September at 4 PM.

The workshop will be conducted in English and Polish.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-04-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews
E-mail: resourcecenter@polin.pl
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: International Institute of Social History

12th European Social Science History Conference

Deadline: 01-05-2017
Location: Belfast

Description

12th European Social Science History Conference

Belfast April 4-7, 2018

The ESSHC aims at bringing together scholars interested in explaining historical phenomena using the methods of the social sciences. The conference is characterized by a lively exchange in many small groups, rather than by formal plenary sessions.

The Conference welcomes papers and sessions on any topic and any historical period. It is organized in a large number of networks:

Africa ‑ Antiquity ‑ Asia ‑ Criminal Justice ‑ Culture ‑ Economics ‑ Education and Childhood – Elites and Forerunners ‑ Ethnicity and Migration ‑ Family and Demography – Health and Environment - ‑ Labour ‑ Latin America – Material and Consumer Culture - Middle Ages ‑ Oral History – Politics, Citizenship and Nations - Religion ‑ Rural ‑ Sexuality - Social Inequality – Spatial and Digital History – Science and Technology ‑ Theory - Urban ‑ Women and Gender - World History

The deadline for pre-registration on our website is 1 may 2017.  To send in a proposal please go to the pre-registration form: https://esshc.socialhistory.org/esshc-user/pre-registration .  For more information on how to send in a proposal please go to guidelines: https://esshc.socialhistory.org/guidelines .

The 12th European Social Science History Conference is organized by the International Institute of Social History in co-operation with the Queen’s University (link is external)in Belfast.

Partners
Queen’s University

Basic information:
Deadline: 01-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: International Institute of Social History
E-mail: esshc@iisg.nl
Website: https://esshc.socialhistory.org/esshc-belfast-2018
Project / event type: workshops
Organiser: EU-Russia Civil Society Forum

Forum for Young Professionals "Europe Lab"

Deadline: 01-05-2017
Location: Gdańsk, Poland

Description

The EU-Russia Civil Society Forum invites young professionals aged between 25 and 35 from the EU, Russia, and other European states to apply for the Annual "Europe Lab" Forum.

Forum for Young Professionals "Europe Lab" is a unique communication and exchange platform for change makers from all over Europe working in public administration, business, NGOs, universities, think tanks, and other fields of professional engagement.
Main goals of “Europe Lab” are to enable cross-sector cooperation and promote exchange of ideas, develop partner and professional networks, and encourage common cross-border projects and initiatives all over Europe. 

The working language of the Forum is English.
“Europe Lab” will take place on 27–30 July 2017 at the European Solidarity Centre in Gdańsk, Poland.
The programme of “Europe Lab” 2017 includes:
Workshops:
•	Freedom and Captivity - Solidarity in the Present and in the Past
•	Climate Change – Where Are You Going?
Innovative Formats:
•	Gdańsk in the Spotlight – City Development Hackathon
•	360° Story – Multimedia Telling
Each format will be curated by a coordinator.
The best common projects, whose ideas were elaborated during the Forum, will be granted. The results will be presented at the 8th General Assembly of the EU-Russia Civil Society Forum in 2018.
Finally, “Europe Lab” alumni are invited to join the young professionals’ platform at the EU-Russia Civil Society Forum, to lead and play a role in a number of future initiatives.
Costs for workshops, accommodation, and meals are covered by organisers. Travel costs are borne by participants themselves.
Please submit your application until 1 May 2017 here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeuBCd2RpZzi-V59S3ZpHGB5PrymjEVrtPUQnZ3PIlM8m7Rig/viewform?c=0&w=1
 
Should you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us via e-mail: europelab@eu-russia-csf.org

See you in Poland!


Forum for Young Professionals “Europe Lab” is organised by the EU-Russia Civil Society Forum in cooperation with the European Solidarity Centre and DRA / German-Russian Exchange as well as supported by the European Commission and the Oak Foundation.
The EU-Russia Civil Society Forum was established in 2011 by non-governmental organisations as a permanent common platform. At present, 153 NGOs from Russia and the European Union are members of the Forum. It aims to foster cooperation among civil society organisations from Russia and the EU and enhance participation of NGOs in the EU-Russia dialogue. The Forum has been actively involved, inter alia, in the questions of facilitating the visa regime, the development of civic participation, protection of the environment and human rights, understanding history, and civic education. Forum's Secretariat is hosted by DRA / German-Russian Exchange.

Partners
European Solidarity Centre, and DRA / German-Russian Exchange, European Commission, Oak Foundation

Basic information:
Deadline: 01-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: EU-Russia Civil Society Forum
E-mail: europelab@eu-russia-csf.org
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Association for Jewish Studies

Call for Papers Association for Jewish Studies Annual Conference of the Association for Jewish Studies

Deadline: 04-05-2017
Location: 49th Annual Conference, December 17-19, 2017 Marriott Marquis Washington, DC

Description

The Call for Papers for the 49th Annual Conference of the Association for Jewish Studies is now available on the AJS website. The online proposal submission site is now open for submissions; the deadline for submissions is May 4, 2017 at 5:00 pm EST.  The conference will take place December 17 - 19, 2017 at the Marriott Marquis Washington, DC.  You will find detailed information about the conference on the AJS website, including a page to share ideas about sessions seeking participants and papers seeking sessions, as well as suggested themes for each subject-area division.
 
AJS is committed to supporting wide participation in the conference and is offering special reduced registration rates for unemployed and retired members. We are also raising funds for our Conference Travel Grant Program and will provide updates about travel grant opportunities in the coming months.

Partners
n/a

Basic information:
Deadline: 04-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Ilana Abramovitch
E-mail: iabramovitch@ajs.cjh.org
Website: http://www.ajsnet.org/conference-menu-2017.htm
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: ICOM Slovenia

Museums and Contested Histories. Between Memory and Oblivion

Deadline: 08-05-2017
Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Description

Museums play a key role in the creation and representation of the shared cultural heritage of different communities. They have become social nodes that encourage peaceful relationships between people and the improvement of society, addressing traumatic histories through mediation and multiple points of view. The discovery of divisive histories and the ability to express what cannot be said are duties that museums must carry out as active co-shapers of society. They can help reach peaceful solutions to traumatic events from the past and foster an understanding of history that encompasses many points of view by sharing knowledge.

ICOM Slovenia, the Slovene Museum Association, the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ljubljana (Department of Sociology) and the National Museum of Contemporary History are organizing an international conference aimed at answering questions about the understanding of hidden histories and the interpretation of cultural heritage today. We are interested in the ways in which collective memories that do not correspond to the dominant historical narratives interact (or do not interact) with the national narrative and how this is reflected in museum exhibitions. What stories are overlooked in museums? How is undesirable and neglected history structured in individual historical periods? What forms and what dismantles public consensus about which heritage should be preserved and in what cases does it become unwanted or even denounced? How does collective memory work and where does forgetting come into play? What limits the freedom of museums and what are the roles of NGOs? What creates consensus and who dictates the interpretation of the past – the professional sphere or politics?	
We invite professionals from the fields to participate and to examine the role of museums today by submitting their abstracts to the two proposed topics. The first conference day will be dedicated to the themes of the change and transformation of museums after the year 1989 (museums about the revolutions, the complex heritage of the wars ...), while the second day will be dedicated to an overview of the newly forming trends and themes in museums and a multifaceted understanding of “contested, difficult, forgotten” history in Europe today. All of this should provide us with a better understanding of the role of museums as tools for creating peaceful communities and an overview of such implementations in different national environments. 

Abstract submission 
Abstract should be no longer than 400 words together with a short biography, institution, the title and a summary of the paper. Abstracts should be sent (in Word format) to: urska.purg@muzej-nz.si and to kaja.sirok@muzej-nz.si 
The deadline for proposals is May 8, 2017. 
The conference language is English. 

A publication of conference papers in a special issue or in a monographic volume is intended. Complete papers should be submitted to the organisers by the end of November 2017.

Partners
Slovene Museum Association, Faculty of Arts of the University of Ljubljana (Department of Sociology), National Museum of Contemporary History

Basic information:
Deadline: 08-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: -
E-mail: urska.purg@muzej-nz.si
Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/277756625993159/
Project / event type: publication
Organiser: Oxford University Press

Edited volume Agency in Transnational Memory Politics: A Framework for Analyzing Practice

Deadline: 10-05-2017
Location: -

Description

CFP: Edited volume Agency in Transnational Memory Politics: A Framework for Analyzing Practice (to be submitted to Oxford University Press)
Deadline: May 10, 2017

Aline Sierp (Maastricht University) and Jenny Wüstenberg (York University, Toronto) are looking for contributors for an edited volume on Agency in Transnational Memory Politics: A Framework for Analyzing Practice  to be published with Oxford University Press.

The relatively young sub-field of transnational memory studies has until recently been marked by a combination of abstract theories with countless detailed but unconnected case studies. This is now beginning to change: scholars such as Michael Rothberg, Astrid Erll, Ann Rigney, Gregor Feindt, and Aline Sierp have worked to develop sophisticated approaches, captured in terms such as multi-vocal, traveling, or entangled remembrance. Our volume seeks to build on this work by honing in on questions of agency in transnational memorialization. In addition, we will draw on scholarship outside the field of memory, such as work in international relations and sociology that has theorized the “agency-structure problem,” informal types of regulation in the literature on global governance, and theories of transnational action in social movement research.

The pivotal question to be answered by the edited volume will be: Who is driving the transnationalization of memory and how is it happening? In our introductory chapter, we will present a framework for analyzing transnational mnemonic action, which will then be utilized by all participating authors. We will offer a typology of transnational memory actors, their strategies, and the transnational regimes of remembrance, which they have helped to create. The contributors to the volume will show through their case studies how this framework can help us make sense of empirical reality.

There are three central ideas that will run through the volume: First, it will focus on further developing our understandings of transnational memory through theory-driven empirical studies. Though we will not compare the case studies in this book through a rigid matrix, our framework will allow us to make comparisons and thus to draw more than merely additive conclusions. Second, the analyses will highlight how agency in memory politics changes outcomes and interacts with structures of political and cultural memory through reproduction and transformation. And finally, we will address the ways in which both the theory and practice of memory politics – even at the transnational level – are tied to places, real and imagined. This is why we will use the notion of transnational space-making.

We are looking for contributors coming from diverse backgrounds including Political Science, History, Sociology, Literary Studies, Anthropology and Media Studies. Contributors must commit to submitting an original paper that engages explicitly with the theoretical framework outlined in the introductory chapter by September 1, 2017. We will then assemble a book proposal to be submitted to Oxford University Press initially. We will also hold an authors’ workshop on December 13, 2017 in Copenhagen for which attendance is highly encouraged.

Please send an abstract of 300 words, as well as a short biography, to aline.sierp@maastrichtuniversity.nl and jwustenb@yorku.ca by May 10, 2017.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 10-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Aline Sierp
E-mail: aline.sierp@maastrichtuniversity.nl
Project / event type: workshops
Organiser: Polish Political Science Yearbook

CFP: Transitional Justice: Between Redemption and Retribution

Deadline: 12-05-2017
Location: Łódź, Poland

Description

CFP: The Łódź PPSY International Seminar “Transitional Justice: Between Redemption and Retribution”. June 6, 2017, Łódź (Poland)
Deadline: May 12, 2017
The “Polish Political Science Yearbook” together with the Faculty of Law and Administration of the University of Łódź and Interdisciplinary Research Centre of University of Łódź “The Balkans at the Turn of the 20th and the 21st Century” invite all scholars to participate in the PPSY International Seminar “Transitional Justice: Between Redemption and Retribution” (June 6, 2017, Łódź, Poland).
The conference supports the special section of the volume 46 (2) (2017) and its objective is to discuss legal and political aspects of transitional justice, shaped during the transitions in the Central and Eastern Europe after 1989, however related as well to the dilemmas of all post-authoritarian and post-conflict societies trying to come to terms with past abuses and historical injustices.
The recent finalization of a peace process in Columbia or events witnessed in Ukraine, where the national desire to reckon with past evils of Viktor Yanukovych’s regime (and Soviet legacy) was brutally confronted with the aggression of the Russian Federation, show that transitional justice is a still living concept. At the same time, the central figure of international criminal justice – the International Criminal Court based in the Hague – serving as a significant tool for post-violence environments has to face the recent decisions of several African states, willing to withdraw from the Rome Statute system.
What is the future of transitional justice? Does really international criminal justice paradigm can reconcile with truth-telling or truth-seeking processes? Are vetting and lustration procedures adequate for countries in the post-Soviet space, such as post-Maidan Ukraine, or should they implement also different transitional justice tool-kit? We are going to address this and many more inter-related questions during the seminar!
The organizers invite authors, coming from a variety of disciplines, including – but not limited to – law, socio-legal studies, political science, international relations and history with papers, posters and presentations related, inter alia, to following issues:
1. Legal approaches to transitional justice
– Rethinking transitional justice – what does the concept mean in 2010s?
– The role of international law in shaping the concept of transitional justice
– International vs local responses to justice
– Transitional justice between retributive responses and reconciliation efforts
– International Criminal Court between law and politics in transitional justice angle.
2. Socio-political dimensions of transitional justice
– Narratives of memory (and identity) in transitional justice efforts
– Politics of memory
– Collective memory and its application by truth-telling and truth-seeking processes
– Conflicts of memory and a cultivation of past evils in a post-war or post-authoritarian environments
3. Current regional approaches of implementing transitional justice
– A peace vs justice dilemma today – does Columbia peace process fill within this debate?
– Transitional justice in a post-Soviet space – the Ukrainian Revolution of Dignity and its implications on Kyiv’s transitional justice strategy
– Transitional justice in the Middle East – how to craft the post-war strategy for Syria and other countries of the region?
All submitted papers will be fast-track reviewed for PPSY 46 (2) of 2017 (the peer-reviewed and indexed international journal, Polish List B – 13 points). The PPSY Special Section on the Transitional Justice will be published in the journal in November–December 2017.
How to Apply:
please submit the Online Application Form (https://goo.gl/XW3Jol) before May 12, 2017. Decisions will be announced on May 15, 2017.
Forms of Participation:
the organisers accept presentation of papers and posters.
Participation Fee:
250 PLN or 60 EUR, paid before May 28, 2017.
The fee includes the accommodation from June 6 to June 7 in double rooms. It does not include costs of travel.
The Organisers:
The Editorial Board of the Polish Political Science Yearbook & Faculty of Law and Administration, University of Łódź, Poland & Research Centre of University of Łódź “The Balkans at the Turn of the 20th and the 21st Century” & Professor Czesław Mojsiewicz International Cooperation Fund & Adam Marszałek Publishing House.
The Organising Committee:
Professor Joanna Marszałek-Kawa, Dr Tomasz Lachowski, Dr Magdalena Rekść, Dr Patryk Wawrzyński
—
More details:
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/199618137202357/
http://www.marszalek.com.pl/yearbook/seminars/transitionaljustice.html (to be available soon)
On-line Application Form: https://goo.gl/XW3Jol.

Partners
Faculty of Law and Administration of the University of Łódź, Interdisciplinary Research Centre of University of Łódź “The Balkans at the Turn of the 20th and the 21st Century”

Basic information:
Deadline: 12-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Polish Political Science Yearbook
E-mail: ppsy@marszalek.com.pl
Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/199618137202357/
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Historical Dialogues, Justice, and Memory Network

Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice

Deadline: 15-05-2017
Location: Columbia University, New York City

Description

6th Annual Conference of the Historical Dialogues, Justice, and Memory Network

Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice
December 7-9, 2017
Columbia University, New York City

In considering the politics and policies of commemorating the past, this conference probes how public discourses about memory change over time. Papers that explore how the past is known, interpreted, conceptualized, or articulated, and how such representations evolve with the passage of time, are welcome. How has the passage of time changed the way memories of historical violence, atrocity and genocide are represented in the public sphere? In what ways do political, social and cultural forces influence, appropriate, or stifle these memories in different ways as the original event recedes into the more distant past? Related topics include the globalization of memory, and with it the increasing popularity of commemorative memorial practices. The proliferation of museums and memorials, the increase in confessional or memorial literature, and the surge of memory laws against Holocaust and genocide denial are some examples of the historical, cultural and legal phenomena that speak to questions of how individuals and communities remember. These modes of ‘making the past present’ speak not only to the passage of time and the forces of multidirectional memory, but also to the ways in which communities understand issues of justice and accountability, memory and amnesia, prevention and the culture of ‘never again’. This conference thus seeks papers that explore the ways in which communities negotiate narrativization of the past over time, and what the implications of such changes in public discourses of memory suggest in terms of present and future political realities, conflict transformation and atrocity prevention, and the role that history itself has in shaping or re-shaping the ways in which individuals and groups relate to the past and future.

The Historical Dialogues, Justice, and Memory Network (www.historicaldialogues.org) is coordinated by an international Steering Committee and the Alliance for Historical Dialogue and Accountability (AHDA), at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights (ISHR), Columbia University.

Instructions for submitting abstracts for panels, roundtables and individual presenters are below. The deadline for submitting abstracts is May 15, 2017. Please note that we have a specific call for a panel on Genocide Prevention for which travel grants may be available.

Panel Submissions

Panels consist of a chair and three 20-minute papers or four 15-minute papers. The chair is expected to start the panel in a timely manner, to introduce each panelist (no more than 1 minute), to ensure that speakers keep to their allotted time, and to moderate the Q and A.  More information about submitting an abstract can be found below.

Roundtables

Roundtable sessions consist of 4-5 discussants and a moderator, who participates more fully in the session than a panel chair would in a traditional panel. Participants in roundtables do not present or read formal papers, but rather engage in a discussion or exchange about a specific question, text, or issue. The focus of discussion must be clearly articulated in the abstract, and participants are expected to prepare their remarks in advance, even if the nature of a roundtable is less formal than a traditional panel.

Conference participants may deliver one paper and participate in one roundtable; they may not participate in more than one formal panel presentation. More information about submitting abstracts can be found below.

Using History in Genocide Prevention Panel

History and the examination of root causes of conflict are a critical long term line of defense against genocide and other identity based crimes or atrocities. While the work of genocide prevention experts focuses on important issues such as economic, political or security incentives, historical aspects of the conflict at hand—the identity of the stakeholders, their animosity towards each other, and other root causes of conflict—are viewed as something that should be set aside, even forgotten, but not engaged. This panel welcomes submissions from both practitioners and scholars that explore ways in which history has been or can be engaged as a form of genocide prevention. Topics can include, but are not limited to, education curricula, museums or media, journalistic and scholarly writings, commemorations and memorials, and other contexts that provide space for discussion and engagement regarding how issues of identity and history can be used in a prevention framework. More information about submitting an abstract can be found below.

Submission guidelines:

To submit a proposal for a panel, please prepare a 350-word abstract that includes the title of the panel and the panel’s scholarly rationale. The abstract should list the names and e-mail addresses for all participants (chair and panelists), a brief bio (2-4 sentences) of each individual, and a title and 100-word abstract of each paper included in the session.

To submit a proposal for a roundtable, please prepare a 350-word abstract that includes the title of the roundtable and the theme, question or challenge that the roundtable seeks to discuss. The abstract should also list all participants (discussants and moderator), their e-mail addresses and a brief bio (2-4 sentences) of each individual.

To submit a paper proposal, please submit a 350-word abstract that includes the title of your paper, a description of the topic you intend to discuss, your e-mail address and a brief bio (2-4 sentences). If you are interested in participating in the Genocide Prevention panel, please indicate this in your submission. Please note that travel grants may be available for participants in the Genocide Prevention session (and only for this session).

The deadline for submitting abstracts is May 15. Please e-mail your submission as a single document to ahda.conference.2017@gmail.com.

Acceptances will be announced (and e-mails sent) in August 2017. Please note that all rooms are equipped with basic A/V equipment (projector, screen and speakers) for presentation needs. Please have any digital presentation you have prepared saved to a flash drive and to your laptop for easy access. Please also note that no presentations can be made in absentia or by Skype; all presenters must be present and must be able to present in English. Please e-mail further questions to ahda.conference@gmail.com.

Partners
-

Project / event type: workshops
Organiser: Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts

Memory Laws: Legal Regulation of Historical Interpretations

Deadline: 15-05-2017
Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Description

Call for Papers Memory Laws: Legal Regulation of Historical Interpretations 
One-day workshop 
Friday, 13 October 2017 
Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (Institute of Culture and Memory Studies), Ljubljana 
Abstract submission deadline: 15 May 2017 
Notification of acceptance: 15 June 2017 
More than a century after the Armenian genocide, it is still difficult to write about it, because one might be severely challenged: in Turkey, for insisting on presenting it as a policy of extermination; in France, for failing to do so. This is just one result of what Richard Evans and Henry Rousso call the “judicialization of history” (Evans 2002; Rousso 2002). After the tide of legislation prohibiting denial of the Holocaust and other crimes, which peaked in the 1990s (Kahn 2004), it is time to evaluate the intended and unintended ramifications of its application and its potential effects on historical memory. In addition, the last twenty years have seen a rise in legislation that indirectly influences social memory by regulating the production, accessibility and dissemination of information about the past (Savelsberg & King 2007), the most prominent example being the laws that regulate access to archives. 
The relationship between collective memory and law has been dominated by the paradigm of transitional justice and the debate on whether legal trials influence how societies remember crimes from the past (Osiel 2000; Douglas 2001). On the one hand, the discipline of transitional justice examines collective memory only in relation to the ideals of peace, reconciliation and dealing with the past (Barahona de Brito 2010). On the other hand, research on the example of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia demonstrated the limitations of the court’s ability to shape collective memories in the region (Gordy 2013; Ristić 2014). However, these issues do not exhaust all aspects of the relation between law and memory, leaving underresearched the phenomenon of “memory laws” - any legal act regulating the interpretation of the past, whether by recognition, sanction or evaluation. This special issue invites more nuanced attention to be paid to the ability of legislation to determine the parameters of admissible and preferred historical accounts. Memory laws are an important aspect of the state-sanctioned politics of memory, selecting and shaping interpretations of past events and promoting specific views of history in the form of both legal acts and their implementation in the courtroom. Furthermore, laws that seemingly do not fall within this category may actually act as memory laws (e.g. laws regulating veterans’ pensions). 
Memory laws can even be abused for other purposes, such as eliminating the political opposition. Finally, national legislation related to historical memory, including governmental and parliamentary declarations and resolutions, is often shaped under the influence of international trends, or used as a tool in international relations. In this sense, international declarations, such as the European Parliament Resolution on European Conscience and Totalitarianism, not only influence the emergence of similar documents in national contexts, they also produce travelling concepts that are appropriated, transformed and used as arguments in political debates related to national memory cultures. This relation between the national and the international level is reciprocal, because it is often states that lobby for the acknowledgment of their past through an international declaration in the first place. 
We welcome papers on topics related to the following: 
- Legislation criminalizing genocide denial in local political contexts 
- Use and/or misuse of genocide-related legislation 
- Recognition of genocide in third countries (e.g. the Armenian genocide in French, German and other contexts; third-country recognition of the Great Famine in Ukraine as a genocide or a crime against humanity) 
- Political uses of the post-communist memory laws 
- National appropriations of the European Parliament Resolution on European Conscience and Totalitarianism 
- Historical revisionism through legislation 
- Legal aspects of historical revisionism 
- Laws on rehabilitation and restitution as memory laws 
- Parliamentary declarations on remembrance from a transnational comparative perspective 
- Theoretical contributions discussing the relation between memory and law 
We especially welcome contributions that step outside the Eurocentric perspective and/or approach transnational dimension. Selected papers are will be published in a special issue of a renowned journal. Organiser will provide affordable accommodation. 
Please submit proposals for papers in the form of a 500-word abstract with a short biography to jovana@zrc-sazu.si AND jelena.dureinovic@geschichte.uni.giessen.de. 
Workshop organisers: Jovana Mihajlović Trbovc Institute for Culture and Memory Studies Research Centre of Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Ljubljana & Jelena Đureinović Department of Eastern European History/International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture Justus Liebig University, Giessen

Partners
Liebig University, Giessen

Basic information:
Deadline: 15-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Jovana Mihajlović Trbovc
E-mail: jovana@zrc-sazu.si
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Willy Brandt Center Wrocław

Cycles of Commemoration. Forced Labor in Europe during World War II

Deadline: 15-05-2017
Location: Wrocław, Poland

Description

CFP: Cycles of Commemoration. Forced Labor in Europe during World War II. International Forum, Willy Brandt Center Wrocław in corporation with the foundation „Rememberance, Responsibility and the Future” (EVZ), Wrocław/Poland, September 27-30, 2017 
 
The three day international forum provides the opportunity to exchange ideas and experiences around the commemoration of forced labor in Europe during World War II. In various formats like public talks, workshops and excursions, participants are invited to exchange their views on the history of NS-forced labor and the ways of commemoration in European comparison. The event is interdisciplinary and addresses researchers especially from history, cultural and social sciences, and experts from the historical-political education, as well as representatives of institutions, which deal with the commemoration of NS-forced labor. Young researchers are particularly welcome. Moreover, the international forum is a platform for receivers of research grants by the foundation EVZ on “Forced labor and forgotten Victims”.
 
The analysis of NS-forced labor was subject to different attention cycles since the end of World War II. At the end of the 20th century the academic and public interest in the history of forced labor was on the rise. With the fall of the Iron Curtain the debates extended their reach to the whole of Europe. A wide range of institutions and organizations dealing with forced labor, paid tribute to the victims and erected monuments and memorials. Not least of all the payments to former forced laborers raised public awareness in many countries of Europe.
 
As contemporary witnesses pass away we are facing a critical juncture of commemoration, which changes the perspective and the narratives of NS-forced labor and public interest seems to decline. The time of World War II is about to pass from contemporary history to history. Despite the disappearance of the so-called experience generation the subject of forced labor has not stopped being important and contemporary. Violence directed against the civilian population, the exploitation of the occupied territory and its inhabitants, abduction and forced migration are only some historical aspects with current references to the present political development in Europe and the world.
 
The aim of the international and interdisciplinary EVZ-forum is the search for answers to some basic questions:
How can we explain that the topic of forced labor was subject to different cycles during World War II?
Which influence did these developments have on the social memory of forced labor and its victims in West, East and Central Europe?
How is this subject present in the public of the affected countries (in official symbols, in regions and villages etc.),
Is there a cross-generational commemoration in the families and in which form?
Which differences exist between the commemoration of the subject in East and West?
What is the role of the knowledge about the granting of financial aid to the victims of forced labor in different countries and commemorative cultures?
Can new media, especially addressing young people, give new impulses to the engagement with the topic and help to keep the memory alive?
How can this subject be anchored in the educational work in schools, museums and memorials?
Which links to present political tendencies and debates arise from the commemoration of NS-forced labor?
Which new approaches to research on NS-forced labor can be found, especially with regard to gender history and public history?
 
Experts of the above mentioned disciplines from Western, Eastern and Central Europe are invited to submit contributions which deal with the broad field of the commemoration of NS-forced labor, with forms of commemoration, commemorative cycles, programs of educational services or insights in the subject itself. Contributions with a country comparative perspective are particularly welcome.
Proposals for talks (max. 30 min.) and workshops (to 1.5 hrs.) are welcome. Conference languages are Polish and English.
 
Abstracts in English (max. 500 words), together with a short curriculum vitae as a PDF file should be sent to:
 
Monika Szydło, 
E-mail:  szydlo@wbz.uni.wroc.pl
 
Deadline is May 15, 2017
 
Travel and accommodation can be covered on request.
 
The conference fee is 150 PLN
 
Contact and Information:
Agnieszka Grzeszczuk
Centrum Studiów Niemieckich i
Europejskich im. Willy’ego Brandta UWr
ul. Strażnicza 1-3
PL-50-206 Wroclaw
Tel.: 48-71-375 95 03 / Fax: 48-71-327 93 61
www.wbz.uni.wroc.pl
E-mail: grzeszczuk@wbz.uni.wroc.pl

Partners
foundation „Rememberance, Responsibility and the Future” (EVZ)

Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: University of York, UK

Placeless Memories: Digital Constructions of Memory and Identity

Deadline: 31-05-2017
Location: York, UK

Description

The Institute for the Public Understanding of the Past (University of York, UK) is pleased to announce a one-day conference in York on 14 July 2017 that aims to open up discussion on the nature of memory and identity construction online and in digital formats. We invite proposals for 20 minute papers on any aspect of the digital construction of memory and identity, and the use of digital resources as source material for scholars studying these issues.

 

The Internet is becoming an everyday space where identities and memories are not only stored, but also shaped and negotiated. User-generated content from websites and OSNs (online-social-networks) is often considered in opposition to authorised or official forms of knowledge (academic, published, or governmental sources) and has been dismissed as frivolous, unmediated, and apparently spontaneous. There is, however, also growing interest in how user-generated content might be used in conjunction with more official forms of knowledge to interrogate the ways in which individuals conceive, communicate, and negotiate national and local histories, memories, and identities. The Internet draws people from different cultural, national, and political backgrounds into dialogue, precipitating both acrimonious clashes and productive knowledge exchange, and creating a deterritorialised forum for the articulation and construction of memory.

 

This under-researched area is of particular importance in an increasingly digital age, and is also timely given recent media interest in online responses to the destruction of physical sites in the Middle East and North Africa. These acts have been met by efforts to digitally preserve threatened places and objects through programs such as The Million Image Database or the crowd-sourced Facebook group Palmyra 3D Model, highlighting the role that rapidly developing technologies might play in education and preservation. Our challenge, however, is to consider the Internet not just as a tool for preserving histories, but as an emergent space where diverse memories and identities are actively shaped, contested, and negotiated in the present moment by a wide variety of different stakeholders. For the disciplines of history, media studies, memory studies, tourism studies, and critical heritage studies, the ways in which events with global reach have been hotly debated in vastly different guises across a range of online forums is of central significance.

 

Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words to huw.halstead@york.ac.uk by 31 May 2017. We warmly welcome proposals from graduate students and early career researchers as well as established scholars. Suggested topics include:

 

1.  What is the nature of digital memories and identities?

– How are memories and identities shaped online and in peer-to-peer discussion?

– How do individuals from different backgrounds or ‘groups’ interact with others online, particularly across historically antagonistic or fragile boundaries?

– How do people draw on – or borrow or appropriate – the memories of others in digital settings?

– How (and why) do certain historical tropes (such as references to Hitler or Nazism) become commonplace rhetorical tools in online debates?

 

2.  Is ‘online memory’ different from ‘offline memory’?

– To what extent does ‘online memory’ replace, or substitute for, physical access to sites of memory?

– Are digital discourses particularly raw, spontaneous, and uncritical, as is often supposed?

– Do cross-cultural dialogues on the Internet strengthen or undermine national and local memories?

– Are these emerging forms of digital memory more ethical or ‘democratic’, or do they replicate the exclusion of certain groups and memories found in more ‘traditional’ memory forums?

 

3. How does the researcher approach these digital constructions of memory and use them in their work?

– How does the researcher use these new sources of knowledge?

– How do they filter the mass repositories of comments and responses on sites such as YouTube or Facebook?

– How do they manage, mediate, and process their own reactions to the sometimes highly emotive content?

– As a source of information, how do these digital dialogues differ from archival sources or ethnographic observation?


Conference registration will be free of charge.


For further information, please see: https://placelessmemories.wordpress.com/

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: The Institute for the Public Understanding of the
E-mail: huw.halstead@york.ac.uk
Website: https://placelessmemories.wordpress.com/
Project / event type: workshops
Organiser: War Crimes Research Group

Reconciliation after War (Crimes): Historical Perspectives

Deadline: 31-05-2017
Location: London, UK

Description

Reconciliation after War (Crimes): Historical
Perspectives
Interdisciplinary workshop, King’s College London, 30 November – 1 December 2017.
Reconciliation is often cited as a key objective in the aftermath of violent conflict, where goals of peace, justice and
reconciliation are seen as not only complementary but mutually reinforcing. But it is often unclear what, precisely, is meant
by reconciliation, how, exactly, different activities and processes might foster reconciliation, and at what level (individual,
community, group, state, inter-state). Moreover, whilst there has been attention to reconciliation internationally in the
contemporary era and much discussion about the relationship between processes of transitional justice and reconciliation in
contemporary contexts, little is known or written about how reconciliation has been practised (or not) in the past. Has
reconciliation ever truly been achieved, or is reconciliation better understood as a trajectory to which there is no ‘end-state’?
This workshop will bring together historians and others from different disciplines to explore the concept and practice of
reconciliation in different periods in the past and in different cultural, geographical and historical contexts to explore, inter
alia, these questions:
• How has reconciliation been conceptualised and practised across time and space – in different regions of the world
and throughout history?
• What factors have affected the success or failure of attempts to achieve post-conflict reconciliation?
• How have parties addressed issues of accountability, reparation, punishment, forgiveness, mercy, repentance and
grace?
• How has reconciliation been resisted? Where and by whom?
We invite contributions that address these themes from a wide variety of perspectives, and historical eras – ranging from
the English and American Civil Wars to more contemporary histories drawing on twentieth century experience around the
globe. We welcome submissions from artists, practitioners, PhD students, early career researchers and established scholars.
We anticipate publishing those papers selected for the workshop in an edited volume/journal special edition.
Please send your paper proposal to Henry Redwood (henry.redwood@kcl.ac.uk) by 31 May 2017, including:
• Name, affiliation and contact email.
• Title and 250-word abstract
• A brief biographical note
This workshop is part of an AHRC-funded project, Art and Reconciliation: Conflict, Culture and Community, a major
collaborative initiative involving an inter-disciplinary team of investigators at King’s College London, the London School of
Economics and The University of the Arts in London. The research is funded under the Conflict Theme of the Partnership
for Conflict Crime and Security Research (PaCCS), an initiative of Research Councils UK, and the Global Challenges
Research Fund (GCRF). For more information, contact Rachel.kerr@kcl.ac.uk or see www.artreconciliation.org.uk

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Rachel Kerr
E-mail: rachel.kerr@kcl.ac.uk
Project / event type: publication
Organiser: Forum Kritika

Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue

Deadline: 30-06-2017
Location: -

Description

Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue
Dealing with the Past: Mapping the Edges of “Historical Dialogue”

Historical dialogue is a growing field of scholarship and practice that engages with the legacy of historical violence and its ties to contemporary politics. It is informed by the recognition that many contemporary conflicts germinate from the memory of past violence, and it is particularly pertinent for the field of conflict transformation and prevention in conflict and post-conflict societies. By its very nature, then, historical dialogue is multidisciplinary, taking place within academic disciplines as well as (but not exclusively) with law, journalism, education, film, art, and literature. As a result, while the term “historical dialogue” has been used in a range of contexts—in scholarship, practice-based research, political interventions, among others—differences persist regarding the precise conceptualization of the term.

The Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue seeks to map the edges of the field, to disentangle the different readings of the expression “historical dialogue” along disciplinary, regional, religious, ethnic and class lines, to name but a few. While these questions are relevant for the term “historical dialogue” in and of itself, they have emerged in productive and compelling ways as a result of the digital humanities, “Mapping Historical Dialogues Project” (MHDP), developed at Columbia University, and part of the Historical Dialogues, Justice and Memory Network. The objective of this digital project is to map existing stakeholders who are engaged in historical dialogue and who use historical narrative to respond to drivers of conflict or as a means of conflict transformation. The project thus seeks to describe the impact that the memory of sectarian and national violence has on contemporary politics, to establish the norms of historical dialogue, and to explore how this knowledge facilitates work towards conflict transformation, reconciliation, peacebuilding, and democracy promotion, particularly in post-conflict countries.

And yet such goals beg the question of how to define “historical dialogue” in methodological and theoretical terms. This Forum Kritika thus seeks to understand how the term “historical dialogue” is used in different disciplines (e.g., political science, history, theology, literary studies, cultural studies, etc.), and what the relationship is between “historical dialogue” and certain regions or discursive environments. Other possible topics can consider the relationship between the concept of “historical dialogue” and its connection or intersection with terms such as transitional justice, memory studies, peace building, or conflict resolution. Is it designed as an alternative term and if so, what is its particular contribution in both academic and practical terms? In considering, for example, the differences between “historical dialogue” and transitional justice, should one define such differences in analytical terms or normative terms, or both? Additional topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the genealogy of the term “historical dialogue”—when and how it emerged, who has framed the term, and how it has been applied; the relationship between theory and practice regarding historical dialogue work; case studies (in particular, but not exclusively regarding initiatives that appear in the MHDP) and country studies; best practices and the impact of historical dialogue as a conflict transformation mechanism; and the relationship between historical dialogue and accountability.

Submission guidelines

Contributions should be 7,000 to 8,000 words (MLA style). Include the following elements in the submission: abstract (200 to 250 words); bionote (100 to 150 words); keywords (5 to 7); institutional affiliation and e-mail address. All contributions will undergo double blind peer review. Send contributions and inquiries to the guest editors of the Forum Kritika (cc: kk.soh@ateneo.edu):

            — Ariella Lang (al223@columbia.edu)

            — Dimitris Kousouris (dimkous@gmail.com)

Use the subject heading “Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue.” Deadline is on June 30, 2017.

Kritika Kultura is a peer-refereed electronic journal (indexed in MLA, DOAJ, Scopus, and Thomson Reuters), which is devoted to the innovative, multidisciplinary study of language, literature, culture, and society.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-06-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Forum Kritika
E-mail: kk.soh@ateneo.edu
Website: http://journals.ateneo.edu/ojs/index.php/kk/announcement/view/35
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

MARCH ’68 – FIFTY YEARS LATER

Deadline: 30-06-2017
Location: Warsaw, Poland

Description

Call for Papers
MARCH ’68 – FIFTY YEARS LATER
International Academic Conference
13-15 March 2018
POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews – University of Warsaw
Warsaw, Poland

(Deadline for submissions: 30 June 2017)

In March, 1968, Polish universities witnessed an outburst of protests against the policies of the communist authorities. Students and the intelligentsia opposed the restrictions of intellectual freedom and the withdrawal from the post-Stalinist liberalization of the system. The demonstrations, which began at the University of Warsaw campus, soon spread over the streets of cities and towns, turning into a mass youth rebellion. They marked the onset of one of the most complex socio-political crises in the post-war history of Poland.

The regime responded with brutal repressions and a widespread anti-Semitic propaganda campaign, launched under the pretext of the Jewish origin of some of the protests’ participants. By appealing to the anti-Jewish sentiments in Polish society, the government aimed at vilifying its opponents in the public eye. In the background, a struggle for the leadership of the communist party was taking place. The purge within the state administration and party ranks, executed under the slogan of combating Zionism, was the perfect tool to get rid of political rivals and to create new elites (a prelude to the campaign took place one year earlier, after Israel won the Six-Day War). The anti-Semitic campaign affected the entire community of Polish Jews, and its institutions, forcing at least 13,000 people to leave the country. Suppression of intellectual activity and decline of organised Jewish life were the aftermath of March ’68.

To mark the 50th anniversary of these events, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, the Institute of History, and the Institute of Sociology at the University of Warsaw are organizing an international academic conference. During the conference, we wish to discuss the causes, course and aftermath of the events, possibly in comparison to the policies of other countries within the Communist Bloc. We are also interested in the context and parallels pertaining to the global extent of the events that took place in the year 1968.

We invite historians, political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists, cultural studies and literature scholars and other fields within the arts and humanities, and social sciences.

The papers may – albeit not necessarily – cover one or more of the following thematic fields. We are open to other proposals which might broaden the perspective of looking at the March ’68 events.

The youth rebellion, contestation and conformism within the Eastern Bloc (i.a. rebellion of young people in the East and in the West; March ’68 in Poland vis-à-vis student movements in France, Germany, Yugoslavia and Bulgaria; the history of emotions within the communist societies; science, culture, intellectuals, students under the pressure of ideology and censorship; March ’68 at the academic centres and in the provinces; victims and beneficiaries of the March ’68 purges; xenophobia and reception of the anti-Semitic campaign within Polish society; long-term aftermath of the March ’68 propaganda patterns)

Jewish experience of March ’68 (i.a. the Jewish community and its institutions in post-war Poland; Jewish youth prior to March ’68; aftermath of the Six-Day War on Jewish communities within the Soviet Bloc; being confronted with the anti-Semitic campaign and the purges in both national and provincial institutions; destruction of Jewish organisations and institutions; reactions of the environment – solidarity/aggression; the experience of expulsion; economic strategies connected with emigration; adopting to life in their new homelands; attitude of local communities towards the immigrants; March émigrés and Poland; evolution of self-identification and ethnic identities; reactions in the West)

The struggle for power, and legitimizing power, in the communist states
(i.a. mechanisms which drove the struggle for power and the creation of new elites; the role of political police; nationalism, egalitarianism, anti-elitism as arguments for legitimacy; authoritarian mobilisation of the masses; propaganda campaigns and purges; forced emigration from the Eastern Bloc; Israel, Jewish minorities and the official anti-Semitism in the politics of the communist states)

Aftermath of March ‘68
(i.a. the year 1968 as a breakthrough in the social history, the history of ideas, the culture of Eastern-European countries; the end of illusions of a possible rectification of socialism; memory and reflection of the March ’68 experience in culture and historiography; the ’68 generation in political and social life; the public silence on the subject of Jews in Poland post-1968 versus intergenerational communication; “invisible Jews” – existence of the Jewish community in the 1970s and 1980s and the individual experience of being a Jew; problems of rebuilding the Jewish community)

We kindly ask you to submit 200-300 word abstracts in ENGLISH (indicating the choice of language of presentation: English or Polish), as well as a short biographical note via electronic application form available at the Internet address: www.polin.pl/en/conf68 no later than 30 June 2017.

We are particularly looking for papers presenting new, original research and reflection.

The organizers cover the costs of accommodation in Warsaw during the conference. The organizers reserve the right to publish the conference materials.

For any additional information, please contact us at: march68conference@polin.pl

Partners
University of Warsaw

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-06-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews
E-mail: march68conference@polin.pl
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