Deadline: 28-01-2018
Location: Linz/Upper Austria

Description

Workplace Democracy Revisited: Labour and Practices of Participation, Workers’ Control and Self-Management in Global Perspective

54th ITH Conference

Linz/Upper Austria
6-8 September 2018

The attempts to extend democracy from the political sphere to labour relations and the broader economy (Self-Government in Industry, as G.D.H. Cole wrote in 1917) keep resurfacing in various forms and under different names throughout the existence of both modern industry and agriculture. Producer cooperatives have been an alternative form of enterprise organization in capitalist economies at least since the 19th century. Very different schools of thought supporting workers’ “associationism” – socialist, anarchist, Christian – have seen worker-run enterprises as the basis of a more egalitarian society. Communist revolutionaries envisioned workers’ councils as the building block of post-capitalist political and social structures ever since soviets came to prominence in the 1905 and 1917 revolutions in Russia, but also a range of revolutionary stirrings in the aftermath of World War I (Germany and Austria 1918-19, Hungary 1919, Italy 1920, etc.). After the failed attempts of revolutionary change in Europe, the German, Austrian and Czechoslovakian states introduced new legislations enabling workers’ participation and representation on the enterprise level to various degrees.

During the Cold War countries, such as Israel, Algeria, Peru and, most prominently, Yugoslavia, attempted to carve out a third way model of development by implementing workers’ self-management structures in their economies. Many postcolonial state building projects in Africa and beyond fused the idea of workplace democracy with local communal traditions. Workers’ self-management also served as an inspiration to dissidents in Eastern Europe (Hungary, Poland), while closely related terms such as autogestion and even operaismo became leitmotifs within the 1968 movement in Southern Europe as a vision of a more democratic socialism. Numerous welfare state models in the European countries, ascribed to the political “West”, developed partly far-reaching legal bases for workers’ participation, often relying on the concepts introduced by the legislative reforms immediately after World War I.

In the 1980s, the self-management ideals of liberation in the most developed capitalist societies and in factories worldwide often metamorphosed into management tools within the framework of neoliberal politics. While many activists in (state-)socialist Eastern Europe envisioned workplace democracy as an opportunity to introduce economic democracy from below, notions of workplace autonomy were also used by the pro-market reformists inside the communist parties to decrease guaranteed workers’ rights. During the 1990s, when it seemed that the ideas of workers’ engagement in economic decisionmaking lost validity, a movement of factory occupations emerged in Argentina and other countries in Latin America, provoking a new wave of interest and debates about the perspectives of workplace democracy in the 21st century.

State of the Art and Research Gaps

As this short historical outline shows, initiatives for democratization of labour relations were carried by vastly disparate social actors under diverse types of labour regimes and political rule in many different parts of the globe. Not surprisingly, a substantial research literature on these phenomena has developed. Yet, studies of workers’ activation tend to have a narrow focus when it comes to the socio-economic complexity and the geographical scope of workplace democracy. Firstly, the topic has traditionally attracted left-leaning social scientists and heterodox economists inclined to look at the political organizing of the working class and economic performance of the enterprises respectively, thus overlooking labour relations and the inner workings of workplace democracy. Secondly, the studies were habitually framed in the context of individual nation states with the most illustrious historical projects claiming workers’ emancipation attracting the greatest attention.

The attempts to produce overviews on the history of workers’ participation, control and selfmanagement practices in different countries usually amounted to collections of individual case studies with moderate comparison, disregarding mutual influence, transnational exchange and transfers.

Conference Goals

In order to contribute to closing some of these gaps, the 2018 ITH Conference poses the following two strategic goals (with some potential topics listed below):

1.) To unpack and categorise the often interchanging terms and conceptualizations of workplace democracy such as self-management, control, participation, co-determination and autogestion (in different languages) by tracing their evolution globally and relating them to particular geographic locations, cultural contexts and historical conjunctures:

 Classifying various examples of workplace organization without conventional management. We want to approach the debates about terms and concepts not only from a theoretical point of view, but as a theme of historical enquiry through concrete case studies. The categorisations should account for the aspirations of the involved actors (autonomous coalitions, trade unions, employers/management, and the state), aiming to realize their interests within the existing order, going beyond the given boundaries or various in-between solutions.

 The circulation of ideas about economic democracy across the borders of nation states. Did individual enterprises, labour movements or states that adopted workplace democratization as an official part of their policies make conscious efforts to promote their models internationally and what impact did they make?

 Experiences of workplace democracy in the periphery. What were the peculiar challenges that advocates of workplace democracy in the Global South, yet also in economically underdeveloped societies and regions of the Global North, and in the state socialist countries had to face? Factors to be kept in mind include the peculiar features of the working class, the lack of technical expertise for the daily running of the production process and the widespread informal economy.

 The inclusion and categorization of experiments to democratize and control the organization of agricultural work, service sector as well as the less known instances of workers’ involvement in the industry, regardless of whether they portrayed themselves as revolutionary or not, such as the instances of cooperativsm linked to traditional communal forms of economic organization in Latin America, Africa and Asia.

 The prominence of workplace democracy as a topic inside the transnational institutions and initiatives, such as the United Nations, ILO, socialist internationalisms, Non-Aligned Movement, etc.

2.) To examine workplace democracy beyond the political history of workers’ movements or business history of alternative management models by investigating the actual practices of workers’ involvement, decision-making and work conditions in concrete cases:

 The altered ways in which workers conceived of themselves, their enterprise and  communities after the introduction of some form of workplace democracy. Was there an increased identification with the work collective, improved work efforts, appearance of voluntary labour, broadening of concerns for social or political issues, or different forms of inequalities within the enterprise?

 The main challenges associated with the collective participation in workplaces: mock involvement, contested decision-making processes, inefficiency, lack of accountability, parochialism, bureaucratization, clientelism, emergence of unofficial leaderships, etc.

 The new concepts and definitions of economic performance and individual work efforts: What were some of the ways in which workers’ ran enterprises, defined ownership rights, measured and distributed net income, wages, social service funds, etc.?

 The relations between individual self-managed collectives and the broader economy and society: What were the models and difficulties of expanding democratic economic decision-making beyond individual enterprises, and connecting economic democracy to political institutions and everyday tasks in the surrounding communities? What effect does the market have on workplace democracy?

SUBMISSION

Proposed papers should include:
 abstract (max. 300 words)
 biographical note (max. 200 words)
 full address und e-mail address

The abstract of the suggested paper should contain a separate paragraph explaining how and (if applicable) to which element(s) or question(s) of the Call for Papers the submitted paper refers.
The short CV should give information on the applicant’s contributions to the field of labour history, broadly defined, and specify (if applicable) relevant publications. For the purpose of information, applicants are invited to attach a copy of one of these publications to their application.
Proposals to be sent to Lukas Neissl: lukas.neissl@doew.at

TIME SCHEDULE

Submission of proposals: by 28 January 2018
Notification of acceptance: 9 March 2018
Full papers or presentation versions: by 5 August 2018

PREPARATORY GROUP

Dario Azzellini, ILR School, Cornell University, Ithaca
Frank Georgi, Centre d’Histoire Sociale du XXème Siècle/Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
Goran Musić, Central European University, Budapest
Lukas Neissl, ITH, Vienna
Brigitte Pellar, Vienna
Anne Sudrow, Centre for Contemporary History Potsdam
Advisers:
Marcel van der Linden, International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam
Susan Zimmermann, ITH, Vienna

THE ITH AND ITS MEMBERS

The ITH is one of the worldwide most important forums of the history of labour and social movements. The ITH favours research pursuing inclusive and global perspectives and open-ended comparative thinking. Following its tradition of cooperating with organisations of the labour movement, the ITH likewise puts emphasis on the conveyance of research outside the academic research community itself. Currently ca. 100 member institutions and a growing number of individual members from five continents are associated with the ITH.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 28-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Lukas Neissl
E-mail: lukas.neissl@doew.at
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Institute of History of the Czech Academy of Scien

Czechoslovakia in Transformations of 20th Century Europe

Deadline: 30-01-2018
Location: Prague

Description

Czechoslovakia in Transformations of 20th Century Europe
25.09.2018 - 27.09.2018
Prague

The centenary of establishment of the Czechoslovak State gives us an opportunity to reflect on its existence and make a certain historical evaluation. What was the significance of this state for its state-forming nations and ethnic groups that lived in it? What was its significance for Europe and the world at the time of its existence between 1918 and 1992? We should also ask questions concerning the sources and strengths from which this state drew its resolution to become an equal partner to all other national formations in Europe and the world, which were hundreds of years older, and which of its values we adhere to and preserve.

These are the basic issues addressed by the international scientific conference, which seeks to examine these points in all spheres of life of the Czechoslovak society, i.e. the foreign political, domestic political, economic, social or cultural aspects. The basic principle of the approach is comparison of Czechoslovak development with other comparable countries of the region (especially the neighbouring countries – Poland, Hungary, Austria, etc.) and interaction with key stages of European history. The six sections (foreign political, domestic political, economical, state-national, social and cultural) should include contributions of a synthetic nature on these issues, capturing the continuities and discontinuities of the Czechoslovak development.

Official languages: Czech, Slovak and English (simultaneous translations)

The organizers reserve the right to choose the papers.

The conference will result in a reviewed collective monograph. The papers must be submitted no later than the date of the conference.

Travel and accommodation costs of foreign speakers are paid by the organisers.

Partners
The Institute of History of the Czech Academy of Sciences Prague; The Institute of History of the Slovak Academy of Sciences Bratislava

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Jan Němeček
E-mail: senat1918-2018@hiu.cas.cz
Website: http://www.hiu.cas.cz/cs/download/prihlaska_application-form.docx
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: University of York

Remembering Across the Iron Curtain: The Emergence of Holocaust Memory in the Cold War Era

Deadline: 30-01-2018
Location: York

Description

Remembering Across the Iron Curtain: The Emergence of Holocaust Memory in the Cold War Era

03.09.2018 - 04.09.2018
York

The Cold War influenced how people, societies and states dealt with and understood the Holocaust and its aftereffects. Yet historiography tends to neglect the role the block confrontation played in shaping scholarship, trials, and memory in Western Europe, the US and Israel. At the same time ideological and political manipulations of collective memory are highlighted and at times overestimated in treatments of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. Rarely can we see discussions of Holocaust memory that look at both East and West. Foregrounding the essential role of the Cold War, this international workshop asks how it affected research, legal proceedings and collective and individual memories. 
Recently, historians have challenged the assumption that research on the Holocaust begun only with the Eichmann trial in 1961, and have highlighted the role mostly Jewish scholars and lay people played in documenting the murder of European Jews immediately after the liberation, or even before. This new perspective has made historians reconsider Eastern European Holocaust Memory, showing how people acting outside the state’s framework succeeded in making room for at least limited discussions of the Holocaust. Such new research has challenged the assumption that here memory was either completely silenced or entirely politically manipulated. 
At the same time a closer look at Western Europe, the United States and Israel shows how, there also, political ideologies shaped narratives and understandings of the Holocaust. From the 1950s onwards, and especially in the years during and following the Eichmann trial, Holocaust memory also frequently became an object or terrain of political fights within the bipolar confrontation. 
Breaking with narrow, national frameworks this workshop aims to find new ways to understand Holocaust commemoration and memory. We are interested in examining how different, and at times contradictory, narratives of the past shaped one another, how marginalized voices aimed to influence public understandings of the past, and how state and non-state actors negotiated cultural representations of the Holocaust. We are looking for comparative and transnational understandings that go beyond Cold War divisions. Bringing together scholars who work on different regions, and especially enabling conversations between scholars of Eastern and Western Europe, opens opportunities for new perspectives on Holocaust Memory as well as the cultural history of the Cold War.

We welcome papers that address the overarching theme of Holocaust Memory in the Cold War Era from a variety of disciplinary perspectives such as history, literary studies, art history, politics, memory studies and sociology, and especially contributions investigating research questions such as:
How did the Cold War influence interpretations of the Holocaust? 
What role did ideological frameworks and concepts such as totalitarianism, antifascism or genocide play?

How did non-state researchers and their institutes negotiate and situate themselves within the Cold War frame? Did transnational networks develop beyond Cold War boundaries, and what role did Jewish actors and institutions play in such cooperations?

How were individual memories influenced by larger narratives? How did they differ from, respond to and resist or challenge public representations of the Holocaust?
Please send an abstract of about 300-400 words and a brief biography to Anna Koch ak1466@york.ac.uk and Stephan Stach stach@usd.cas.cz by January 30. 
Limited funding will be available for some scholars.

Partners
Institute for the Public Understanding of the Past, University of York and Institute of Contemporary History, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague.

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Anna Koch
E-mail: ak1466@york.ac.uk
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Research Network “Memoria y Narración”

Memories in motion: transnational and migratory perspectives in memory processes

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Stockholm, Schweden

Description

International Congress: Memories in motion: transnational and migratory perspectives in memory processes

Date: 4-5 June, 2018
Location: Romanska och klassiska institutionen- Stockholm University 

The Network

The International Network “Memoria y Narración” consists of an international and interdisciplinary group of researchers and was founded in November 2014 at the University of Aarhus. The network is composed of researchers from more than 35 European and American universities. It is coordinated by Juan Carlos Cruz Suárez (formerly Aarhus University, now University of Stockholm), Claudia Jünke (University of Innsbruck) and José María Izquierdo (University of Oslo). The Network originates in the research project “The Novelized Memory” directed by Hans Lauge Hansen (Aarhus University).

The Network “Memoria y Narración” is focused on memory processes, particularly on the memory of past violence and violations of human rights, in Spain and Latin America, as the Spanish-speaking countries suffered various oppressive dictatorships during the twentieth century. This is due to a number of widely studied political circumstances and, in some way, a characterizing feature of the way in which these countries underwent processes of modernization, democratization and economic development. As the 2018 conference will be hosted by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures of the University of Stockholm – an institution where Spanish is studied together with Portuguese, Italian and French – we wish to establish, on this occasion, a dialogue with memory discourses and memory studies related to other Romance languages and cultural contexts.

The 2018 Conference

The aim of the 2018 congress at the University of Stockholm is to explore the ways in which contemporary cultures face their violent pasts through the production of all types of cultural products. Memory plays a fundamental role in this regard, since its high degree of reflexivity leads to the encounter with the past and provides interpretations of events that can facilitate processes of recognition, justice or reconciliation. Moreover, we also invite analysis and reflections on migratory processes in the configuration of local memories, especially in countries with a high degree of immigration.

We want to gather researchers in order to debate new methodologies, theories and possible ways to interpret, analyze and criticize cultural memory works in literature and the arts from a comparative point of view across different languages and disciplines. In confronting the violent past and the cultural product itself, we may observe how cultural identities could potentially be re-configured and expressed in the present. This fact allows a glimpse into each analyzed socio-cultural context in order to highlight the differences between each memory process and, at the same time, the concordances between the different societies studied. The conference aims at investigating the relationship, interdependence, similarities and differences of processes of remembrance in different cultures and how these are portrayed in literary and artistic expressions.

The congress will take place at the University of Stockholm on the 4th and 5th of June 2018. There will be two sessions on each day (morning and afternoon). During the first day, there will be lectures in English given by the keynote speakers. In the morning session of the second day, the participants will present their papers in parallel panels. Each panel consists of 6 presentations and their corresponding discussions. The language of each panel will correspond to the respective area of study, that is, English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and Italian.

Keynote speakers

Prof. Walther Bernecker, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Prof. Astrid Erll, University of Frankfurt am Main 
Prof. Natan Sznaider, University of Tel Aviv

Submission of abstracts

The congress invites abstracts from junior and senior academics in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French and Italian. Submissions exploring any topic related to the study of memory and narration are welcome; however, submissions on the following themes are particularly encouraged:

transnational memories in comparative perspectives
global memory flows
post-memories and narration
memories in motion across disciplinary boundaries
memories and migratory processes
configuration of local memories in migration
memory and processes of recognition, justice or reconciliation
travelling memories across frontiers and languages
memories as travelling testimonies
collective and individual memories of migrant groups
Each presentation should last a maximum of 20 min. since there will be a question time after the presentations. Each submission must include: an abstract of no more than 250 words, 4 keywords, the speaker’s full name including title, position, contact details and institutional affiliation, as well as a short biography of about 150 words. Please note that the deadline for submissions is the 31st of January 2018. Submissions will not be accepted after the deadline. Multiple submissions will not be accepted. Abstracts should be sent to one of the following addresses: Juan.Cruz@su.se (Juan Carlos Cruz Suárez) or Azucena.Castro@su.se (Azucena Castro). Applicants will be notified via e-mail by the 1st of March. There will be no conference fee. In the e-mail confirming the acceptance of the abstracts we will send further information about accommodation in Stockholm and transport possibilities.

Further questions about the congress can be addressed to Azucena Castro (Azucena.castro@su.se)

Conference venue

Romanska och Klassiska Institutionen, 
Stockholm University
Frescati campus, Universitetsvägen 10 B-C, plan 4 and 5 
Stockholm, Sweden

Conference languages

English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and Italian

Organizing committee

Prof. Ken Benson, University of Stockholm 
Azucena Castro, PhD candidate, University of Stockholm 
Prof. Juan Carlos Cruz Suárez, University of Stockholm
Prof. José María Izquierdo, University of Oslo 
Prof. Claudia Jünke, University of Innsbruck

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Azucena Castro
E-mail: Azucena.castro@su.se
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Science and Research Centre of the University of P

Laboratory of Yugoslav Political Innovation: The Origins, Synthesis and International Influences of Self-Management Socialism

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Koper, Slovenia

Description

Laboratory of Yugoslav Political Innovation: The Origins, Synthesis and International Influences of Self-Management Socialism

Koper, Slovenia
10-11 May 2018
Deadline: 31 January 2018

After the split with the Cominform in 1948, the Yugoslav system confronted different agents and traditions of European leftist thought: on the one side, it was seen by Western left-wing circles as a laboratory of socialist innovation, while on the other, for East European politicians and intellectuals, it posed as a model of resistance toward Soviet hegemony. For that reason, we can observe an interesting, but until now scarcely researched and discussed, transnational political experiment that, as an attempt to organise society from the bottom up, attracted a lot of attention globally: from representatives of socialist and social-democrat parties adhering to the Third International, progressive movements, experts in different areas of social organisation, as well as supporters of the New Left. Following the process of Yugoslav political innovation from a transnational perspective offers a unique opportunity to observe a conceptual and political interaction which went beyond the strict division between East and West and became an intriguing combination of liberal democracy and Marxism-Leninism that also unmasked the undemocratic aspects of the Yugoslav one-party system. The debate between Yugoslavia and Western Europe opened up many key problems of that time. Initially, in the contacts of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia and its mass organisations with the representatives of western left-wing parties, and subsequently in dialogue between Yugoslav left-wing intellectuals and the western New Left. Together they addressed issues like resistance to Soviet hegemony over the international socialist movement; worked toward overcoming a bipolar division of the world, maintaining world peace, equal economic cooperation, and later anti-authoritarianism, local self-government, direct democracy, total dealienation, environment preservation, etc.
The aim of this conference is first to reconstruct, from a time distance that allows us to access hitherto unavailable archival sources, the course of the Yugoslav-western European debate on the perspectives of self-management socialism, and, secondly, to determine its significance for the development of a political theory and practice both in Tito's Yugoslavia as well as in capitalist countries. Drawing on this context, the conference aims to ascertain which forms succeeded in penetrating Yugoslav society, and vice versa, the impact of the self-management experiment on industrial democracy in western European and democratic transitions in Mediterranean countries from the early 1950s to the late 1980s. We would also like to address the question regarding how the Soviet Union and its satellite countries reacted to the Yugoslav alternative to the state-socialist model and how “Open Marxism” and Eurocommunism challenged its aspiration to present itself as a ‘third way’ alternative to liberal capitalism and state socialism. Historians as well as scholars from the fields of political science, international relations and economy who will take into account themes broadly outlined in the description above are encouraged to apply. The conference will be organised by the Science and Research Centre Koper, Slovenia. Funding opportunities for accommodation will be available.

Submission: Please send a paper title and an abstract of max. 400 words by 31st January 2018 to jure.ramsak@zrs-kp.si 

Programme Committee: Jože Pirjevec, Mateja Režek, Jure Ramšak

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Jure Ramšak
E-mail: jure.ramsak@zrs-kp.si
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: EUROCLIO

Call for Registration: Mediterranean Dialogues: Teaching History beyond our Horizons

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Marseille, France

Description

EUROCLIO is proud and happy to announce the official call for registration for our 25th Annual Conference & Professional Development and Training Course "Mediterranean Dialogues: Teaching History beyond our Horizons". The conference is hosted and co-organised by EUROCLIO’s co-founding member organisation from France, the Association des Professeurs d’Histoire et de Géographie (APHG). The conference will take place in Marseille, France’s door to the Mediterranean horizon, from 21 to 26 April 2018.

Register now: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/25th-euroclio-annual-conference-training-course-mediterranean-dialogues-registration-37644625087

The Mediterranean Sea has often been depicted as the cradle of world civilisations. The sea is known in English and the Romance languages as the sea “between the lands”, but historically the Mediterranean Sea has gone by many names. The Romans have called it Mare Nostrum (Our Sea); in Arabic and Turkish the sea is often referred to as the White Sea (al-Bahr al-Abyad and Akdeniz, respectively); in Hebrew, it is called Yam Gadol (Great Sea), and in German Mittelmeer (Middle Sea).
Since Antiquity, the Mediterranean Basin has been the centre for the three monotheisms, flourishing civilisations, migrations, the development of cultural, scientific and economic exchanges, but also for the intersections of wars. Today, unfortunately, the Mediterranean Basin is the theatre of a humanitarian crisis that has challenged the collective leadership around the sea.

To understand the current challenges around the Mediterranean, history, heritage, and citizenship education has a key role to play. That is precisely the reason why EUROCLIO and APHG have decided to choose “Mediterranean Dialogues: Teaching History beyond our Horizons” as the theme for its 25th Annual Conference. Questions addressed are:

How can we make current challenges understandable through the Mediterranean Region’s history?
How can we work towards truly meaningful Mediterranean dialogues?
Can history education allow us to look beyond our European horizons?
And, how can we teach history by looking beyond our horizons?

Partners
Association des Professeurs d’Histoire et de Géographie

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: EUROCLIO
E-mail: secretariat@euroclio.eu
Website: http://euroclio.eu/mediterranean-dialogues
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Instytut Historii Polskiej Akademii Nauk

Gender and the State. 100 years of the fight for equality in Central-Eastern Europe

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Instytut Historii Polskiej Akademii Nauk

Description

Gender and the State. 100 years of the fight for equality in Central-Eastern Europe

27-29/11/2018
Instytut Historii Polskiej Akademii Nauk

Deadline: 31/01/2018

The decree of the Head of State and Prime Minister granting full voting rights to all Polish citizens "without regard to sex/gender" issued in November 1918, was a milestone in the development of civic equality. It was also a special moment for women's emancipation movements, being at the same time the high point of their political efforts and the beginning of their socio-political participation as citizens with full rights of the newly recreated Polish state.

The hundredth anniversary of the introduction of these revolutionary laws, which falls in November 2018 in many European countries, is cause for reflection on the scope and character of equal rights over the course of this relatively long period, methods used in the fight for the equal political and legal position of women, as well as the role of state institutions and national and ethnic communities in these processes.
The Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences is pleased to invite you to participate in the conference entitled "Gender and the State. 100 years of the fight for equality in Central-Eastern Europe", which will take place in Warsaw on November 27-29, 2018.

The goal of the conference is to take stock of the political, social and cultural changes that have been the result of the equal rights movement in Poland and Europe. We also seek to reflect on women's struggle for recognition, their role as citizens and the dynamics of processes of citizen-forming. The place of the political rights they have won in the further struggle for the improvement of women's place in society should also be considered.

One hundred years of women's fight for recognition is at the centre of our interests. The events of November 1918 are a starting point for the search for new perspectives and interpretations of the history of women's emancipation and equality as well as the place of women in relations between the state and society. We are also seeking new approaches to well-known subject matter and would like to restore the memory of women engaged in political and social movements in the last century. We propose the following areas of historical reflection:

1. The history of the concepts of emancipation, equal rights, citizenship and others in various historical times and contexts.

2. Institutions and laws regulating women's access to public space. Legal regulations at the constitutional and statutory level as well as common law.

3. Gender-nation relations and nationality issues connected with the rise of nation states and the character in which women participated in political independence events.

4. The influence of the World Wars on the progress and development of equal rights, concepts and practices and the dynamics of the fight for equality.

5. The transnational and international context of women's rights activity in networks and organisations.

6. The medialisation of the history of the struggle for recognition in a Polish and international context and the presence of these motives in film and visual arts of the last century.

7. Contemporary "re-inventing" of the history of feminism and the women's rights movement, and references to their achievements in political, affirmative, etc. narratives.

We particularly invite presentation proposals from persons working on PhD or postdoctoral projects. Proposals of up to 3000 characters, in Polish or English, along with a brief information about the author, should be submitted by January 31, 2018 to the following address: seminarium.charewiczowej@gmail.com

Information on proposal acceptance will be sent at the end of February.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Instytut Historii Polskiej Akademii Nauk
E-mail: seminarium.charewiczowej@gmail.com
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: International Association for Southeast European A

EMOTIONS, SENSES AND AFFECTS IN THE CONTEXT OF SOUTHEAST EUROPE

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: University of Zadar, Croatia

Description

EMOTIONS, SENSES AND AFFECTS IN THE CONTEXT OF SOUTHEAST EUROPE

Department of Ethnology and Anthropology, University of Zadar
27th – 30th September, 2018

Deadline: 31 JANUARY 2018

The conference seeks to explore the affective dimensions of everyday life in the context of Southeast Europe. In our world that has, for the last decades, been dominated by the impact of rationality and technical progress, of transformation and economic efficiency, of globalization and migration, the role of emotions in all spheres of life has all too often been neglected. It is in the past decade that developments in society, in politics and in other spheres of life have made it obvious that emotions are of utmost relevance and must not by ignored. There is a renewed anthropological interest in the study of emotions, affects and feelings
that bind individuals and groups in various ways, addressing their economic and political uncertainty and directing attention to people’s arts of existence.

The aim of this conference is to extend the exploration of the ‘everyday’ and ‘ordinary’ by focusing on the role of emotions and the varieties of senses in relation to the entire sphere of individual and social life, to social belonging and affect-saturated spaces and institutions such as nation or home region, neighbourhood or friends, family or relatives, strangers or intimates, religious or ethnic groups. Craving for well-being, solidarity and community in a time of insecurities and uncertainties can lead to a return to forms of tradition and heritage, to a strengthening of patriarchal settings or to a desire for religious belonging and spirituality.
On the other hand one can observe almost everywhere that there is a political use and misuse of such emotions, both in liberal left and in far right xenophobic discourses and politics. The political dimensions also include the emotional experience of state oppression under socialism or the loss of trust in public institutions just as well as the experience of wars or other conflicts.

An important aspect will be the ways in which emotions such as love or hatred, compassion or empathy (and lack of this) are expressed in everyday life and language, in pictures, narratives or songs. The aesthetics of expression may be controlled by the ethics of the group which decides on what constitutes beauty and ugliness or what is acceptable and what is not.

Feelings and emotions are essential parts of the human condition, shaping our interpersonal relations and connections as well as our world view. An important goal of the conference will be to apply these basic facts to the context of Southeast Europe, both in the present and in the past.

Accordingly, topics for papers may range widely and include the following:
Post-socialist transformation, neoliberalism, globalization and affective past, present and future (affect and austerity)
Emotional geographies and ordinary affects (cultural landscapes and ordinary affects)
Architecture, art, objects and affective spaces
Crises, wars, disasters and emotions; public feelings and traumas
Nation, region, and cultural heritage
Museum collections, archives and emotions
Politics and emotions, politics of emotions
Public and private life and emotions
Emotions, Senses and Affects
Economy, work, commodities and emotions in the Context of Southeast Europe
Education, schooling, and emotions
Religion, belief and emotions
Life course, gender, childhood, marriage, old age and emotions
Emotions and cultural contexts of health and well-being
Emotions in cross-cultural encounters (migration, diaspora, transnationalism, refugees)
Archives, museum collections and emotions
Expressing emotions: language, verbal traditions, pictures
Songs, music and emotions
Popular culture and the economy of affects.

Please submit a proposal that contains your full name, e-mail address, institutional and disciplinary affiliation, the title of your paper and an abstract of 250 words with specific information about research methods and sources. The organizers give preference to submissions based on fieldwork and/or the use of ethnographic, folkloric, or closely related archive materials. The paper proposal must be in English, while the papers presented at the conference can be in English, French or German.

Panel sessions: We invite colleagues to propose panel sessions. Poster and film sessions: We invite colleagues to propose posters and ethnographic films focused on the congress theme.

The deadline for the submission of panel and paper proposals is 31 JANUARY 2018.

Please send your proposal to:
Assistant Professor Danijela Birt, Department of Ethnology and Anthropology, University of Zadar inasea2018.zadar@gmail.com
Participants will be notified before the end of April 2017 about the acceptance of their paper.

Conference Site, Organization
The 9 th International Association for Southeast European Anthropology (InASEA) congress will be held at
Department of Ethnology and Anthropology, University of Zadar, (Zadar) Croatia.

Funding, Travel and Accommodation
Depending on availability of funding, the conference organizers will cover at least part of the travel and accommodation costs for participants from Albania, Bulgaria, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Greece, Kosovo, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, and Turkey.

Accommodation for participants who qualify for financial support will be pre-arranged. Other participants will also be assisted in making hotel reservations. More information about accommodation will be published on the official website (http://inasea.net/) in due time.

Registration Fee
InASEA members who have paid their dues for the last two years are exempt from the registration fee.
Non-InASEA members and non-paying members will be asked to pay an on-site registration fee equivalent to 25 € (for participants from the above-mentioned SEE countries) or 50 € (for participants from all other countries).

Publication of Papers

A selection of conference papers will be published (after peer review) in vols. 22 and 23 of InASEA’s journal Ethnologia Balkanica.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: International Association for Southeast European A
E-mail: inasea2018.zadar@gmail.com
Website: http://inasea.net/
Project / event type: fellowships / grants
Organiser: The Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Col

Human Rights Advocates Program

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: New York City, New York, USA

Description

The Human Rights Advocates Program (HRAP) is a unique and successful model of human rights capacity building. HRAP capitalizes on its affiliation with Columbia University and its location in New York City to provide grassroots leaders the tools, knowledge, access, and networks to promote the realization of human rights and strengthen their respective organizations.

The program begins in late August and ends in mid-December. It is an in-residence program, and you must be able to live in New York for the full length of the program in order to participate.

Details about the program structure and activities can be found at:
http://humanrightscolumbia.org/hrap/overview

You can also read about past participants at:
http://humanrightscolumbia.org/hrap/advocates

To apply, go to:
http://humanrightscolumbia.org/hrap/admissions-information

The deadline for applications is January 31st at 11:59 GMT.

Partners
Columbia University The Institute for the Study of Human Rights

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Summer Lightfoot
E-mail: sl4345@columbia.edu
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: University of Graz

ASN European Conference: Nationalism in Times of Uncertainty

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Graz

Description

ASN European Conference: Nationalism in Times of Uncertainty
4-6 July 2018
University of Graz, Austria

Deadline: 31 January 2018

The University of Graz, in cooperation with the Association for the Study of Nationalities (ASN), is pleased to announce the joint conference, "Nationalism in Times of Uncertainty" which will be held from 4 to 6 July, 2018 in Graz, Austria. The conference will be organized by the Centre for Southeast European Studies of the University of Graz

The conference invites a broad range of papers and panels devoted to questions of nationalism, ethnicity, national identity and other related topics, with a focus on the Balkans, as well as Central Europe, Russia, Ukraine, Eurasia, comparative and theoretical contributions.
As an interdisciplinary event, it welcomes contributions from political science, history, anthropology, sociology, sociology, law, economics, geography, cultural studies, literature, psychology, and related fields.
We particularly welcome panels and papers reflecting on the question of uncertainty and ruptures, including on

- The Impact of Populism and the Crisis of Democracy
· The Centenary of the End of World War One and the emergence of new states
· Breakdown of the post-WW I order in the Middle East
· The Aftermath of the Russian Revolution
· Muslim Nationalism in a transnational context
· Migration and Nationalist Responses
· Transnational dynamics of nationalism

Prospective applicants can review the broad thematic scope of ASN conference papers by viewing programs from past conferences at: hhttp://nationalities.org/conventions/euro

For more information about the Centre for Southeast European Studies, see
http://www.suedosteuropa.uni-graz.at/

Proposal Submissions
The ASN 2018 European Conference invites proposals for individual papers and panels. The standard panel format consists of a chair and three or four presenters. Conference proposals should be submitted in English. All required information must be included in a single Word or PDF document and attached to a single email message.

Individual Paper Proposal Requirements:
· Contact information: name, e-mail address, and academic affiliation of the applicant.
· Paper abstract (up to 500 words) with the title of the paper and no more than five keywords.
· A 100-word, one paragraph biographical statement in narrative form. Standard CVs will not be accepted.
· Individual proposals featuring more than one author (joint proposals) must include contact information and biographical statements for all authors.

Panel Proposal Requirements:
· Contact information for all panelists: names, e-mail addresses, and academic affiliations.
· Title of the panel and abstract (up to 500 words) for each paper.
· 100-word biographical statement for each panelist. Statements in a standard CV format will not be accepted.

We also welcome book panel proposals, which should include the same information as panel proposals. The books should be significant contributions to the field and preference is given to monographs.
Roundtables are also accepted and applications should follow panel proposal format. These should distinguish themselves from panel proposals by focusing on a) key events or developments, b) methodological questions or c) new fields of research.

As a general rule, no person may appear more than twice on the program and only once as a paper giver.

For more information about the Centre for Southeast European Studies, see
http://www.suedosteuropa.uni-graz.at/

Conference information (program, logistical details, etc.) will be available on the CSEES website.

Travel Grants
There will up to 30 travel and accommodation grants available. The grants are aimed at graduate students and post-docs and will cover travel costs (within Europe up to 200 Euros) and accommodation for the duration of the conference.

Registration
Conference registration costs are
Faculty: 100 Euros (ASN Members: 60 Euros)
Students: 60 Euros (ASN Members: 30 Euros)

Please send your proposals to asngraz18@gmail.com by 31 January 2018

Papers and panels will be assessment by an international board composed of scholars from the ASN and the University of Graz.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent in March 2018.
The deadline for registration is 31 April 2018.
The draft program will be published by the end of May 2018.
For more information, please contact: asngraz18@gmail.com or suedosteuropa@uni-graz.at

Partners
Association for the Study of Nationalities (ASN)

Project / event type: fellowships / grants
Organiser: Wiener Wiesenthal Institut

Fellowship: Wiener Wiesenthal Institut für Holocaust-Studien

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Wiener Wiesenthal Institut

Description

Wiener Wiesenthal Institut für Holocaust-Studien, Wien / Vienna,
01/10/2018-31/07/2019
Deadline : 31/01/2018
The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) invites applications for its fellowships for the academic year 2018/2019.
The VWI is an academic institution dedicated to the research and documentation of antisemitism, racism, nationalism and the Holocaust. Conceived and established during Simon Wiesenthal's lifetime, the VWI receives funding from the Austrian Ministry of Science, Research and Economy as well as the City of Vienna. Research at the institute focuses on the Holocaust in its European context, including its antecedents and its aftermath.
Research projects are to focus on a topic relevant to the research interests of the VWI. Within this parameter, applicants are free to choose their own topic, approach and methodology. Fellows will have access to the archives of the institute. It is expected that fellows will make use of relevant resources from the collection in their research projects. Research results will be the subject of formal fellows' discussions and will be presented to the wider public at regular intervals.
Funding is available for
- two senior fellows,
- two research fellows and
- four junior fellows
to work at the institute for a duration of between six and eleven months. Experience tells that residences between nine and eleven months are the most productive for facilitating the research of the fellows at the VWI.
Senior fellowships will be awarded to qualified scholars who have completed their PhDs, have authored exceptional academic publications and have been working at a university or academic institution for several years.
Research fellowships will be awarded to scholars who have completed their PhDs and have published works in their research field.
Junior fellowships will be awarded to PhD-candidates.
With its fellowships, the VWI seeks to encourage communication and academic exchange among the fellows, providing an additional benefit beyond their research work. The fellows are expected to further the institute's academic work and provide each other with advice and support in their research projects. Fellows must be regularly present at the VWI.
Fellows will be selected by the International Academic Advisory Board of the VWI.
Please attach your application in electronic format (in one *.pdf-file) to an email and submit it by 31 January 2018 to: fellowship@vwi.ac.at
Please see the information sheets on the different fellowships for further particulars on application modalities, aims, selection process and grant sums. These can also be downloaded from the homepage of the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI).

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Béla Rásky
E-mail: fellowship@vwi.ac.at
Project / event type: publication
Organiser: Historical Searches Journal

CfP for the Historical Searches Journal

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: -

Description

Institute for history in Sarajevo has recently redesigned its journal, Historical Searches. The next number of Historical Searches will be dedicated to commemorating the centenary of the dissolution of the Habsburg Empire. However, this date serves only as a motive, our aim is to explore the conditions and consequences of “regime change” in Bosnia and Herzegovina, in the past 150 years. We strive to present both perils and opportunities that arise from these events. In that attempt, we did not limit ourselves only to political and military history but also to other aspects such as sociological impact of regime change, it’s effects on cultural heritage, every-day life and other areas that were impacted by political and military actions in the observed time period. Therefore, we aim to promote multidisciplinary approach. Also, we are not limited to Bosnia and Herzegovina, we are eager to read about similar or different experiences from other nations in our region.
Post-graduate students, researchers, and other related and interested authors are invited to join us and explore this interesting theme. We are searching for papers in Historical Searches to be 5000-8000 words. The papers will be edited and included in the Historical Searches nr 17, and published in October 2018.

Text should be written in font size 12, with 1.5 lines spacing. Notes are footnotes, and not endnotes. Bibliography should be contained in notes, to preserve space.

To aplly with a paper in the Journal, please send (a) your abstract (300 words), as well as (b) a short cv to: nametak@gmail.com

Deadline for abstract: January 31st 2018.
Deadline for complete paper: March 31st 2018.​

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Historical Searches Journal
E-mail: nametak@gmail.com
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Koordinierungsstelle Stolpersteine Berlin

Stumbling Stones – a European form of remembrance between intervention and recognition on 14th and 15th June 2018

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Koordinierungsstelle Stolpersteine Berlin Gedenkstätte Deutscher Widerstand Stauffenbergstraße 13-14 10785 Berlin Germany

Description

The Stumbling Stones memorial project has been active for over 20 years now. It started as a small artistic intervention in a public space: by laying brass plaques in the ground in front of specific houses, measuring 10x10cm and bearing the names and dates of persecuted former residents, the artist Gunter Demnig aimed to commemorate the fate of those persecuted during National Socialism. In the beginning the project was often enough realized without official permission or encountered strong opposition. But over time, its popularity grew and it now counts among Germany’s best known and respected memory projects. Gunter Demnig and his team have not only received various honours and, increasingly, official backing, but are also supported by a broad volunteer movement. Their supporters are not only in Germany – in the meantime, Stumbling Stones have been laid in almost all the countries which were occupied by the Wehrmacht.
The conference will focus on an exchange of views concerning the project’s development in terms of commemoration work and its political-historical contribution, and the positioning of the Stumbling Stones project within the European cultures of remembrance. We would like to invite you to send us proposals for keynotes on the following topics:

1) Stumbling Stones are now being laid in more than 20 European countries. What can we learn from this about the different European cultures of remembrance – do similarities exist? Can differences be found in the way the project is established in memory politics?

2) What motivates people to have Stumbling Stones laid and/or to participate in the project? Do their motives vary from generation to generation? Does the Stumbling Stones project serve the purpose of exoneration on a personal as well as a societal level? Can it exert a “healing effect” on the relatives of persecutees? How does the Stumbling Stones project affect the image of Germany abroad?

3) Nowadays, the reappraisal of the history of National Socialism, and thus the Stumbling Stones project, is part of the national identity of the majority of German society, in political as well as social terms. But how are the voids of remembrance politics represented in this project?

The conference is organised by the “Koordinierungsstelle Stolpersteine Berlin”. It is part of the “Aktives Museum Faschismus und Widerstand in Berlin e.V.” and realizes the project within 12 Berlin districts where local groups of voluntaries do the work. The “Koordinierungsstelle Stolpersteine Berlin” publishes books and teaching aids and has designed an exhibition about the Stumbling Stones project. Furthermore, it organises lectures on various topics connected to remembrance politics on a regular basis.

The conference will be held in English and German and welcomes interested scholars of memory studies and historical research to participate. We would explicitly like to encourage transdisciplinary approaches. We plan to publish the conference proceedings and will make contributions towards travel expenses where possible. As the conference will take place after the laying of further Stumbling Stones in Berlin, we are very glad to announce that Gunter Demnig will be able to open the conference in person.

If you are interested in presenting the findings of your research at the conference, please send us an abstract (max. 3500 characters) of your proposed lecture and a short CV in German or English by 31st January 2018 to info@stolpersteine-berlin.de. All letters of acceptance will be sent by 28th February 2018.

Partners
Aktives Museum Faschismus und Widerstand Berlin e.V. Stauffenbergstraße 13-14 10785 Berlin Germany "Stiftung - SPUREN - Gunter Demnig" Kölner Straße 29 50226 Frechen Germany

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Sophia Schmitz
E-mail: schmitz@stolpersteine-berlin.de
Phone: 0049/30/263989014
Website: www.stolpersteine-berlin.de
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: German Historical Institute, Warsaw

Hidden Children during the Holocaust ̶ Historical Considerations of a Transnational Phenomenon

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Kaunas

Description

Hidden Children during the Holocaust ̶ Historical Considerations of a Transnational Phenomenon

25.06.2018 - 27.06.2018
Kaunas, Lithuania

In many European countries, during the persecution and extermination of Jews throughout the Second World War, Jewish children were destined to hide in improvised settlements, such as secret attics, Catholic convents, or live openly with foreign Christian families. They had to struggle with a sense of being in constant danger and spent their childhood living under life-threatening conditions. They not only endured fear of the Nazi persecution, but in some cases, they also experienced physical and sexual abuse by their “saviors”. In the postwar years, these hidden children, while adjusting to a new life, experienced double trauma. Firstly, many young children were hidden as infants, and, therefore, they could not remember their parents, while others lost their families, who were murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators. Those hidden children, who returned home to their parents, grandparents, or siblings experienced significant psychological problems and had to adapt to their new way of life with their war-traumatized relatives. Secondly, during the war, these children had not only to live separately from their relatives, but they also had to change their identity, and in some cases were demanded to forget their language. Thus in the postwar years, hidden children faced the double hurdles of adjusting to their psychologically damaged parents and to reaccustoming themselves to their prewar Jewish identities. 
After the war, in many countries, the fate of these secret survivors of the Holocaust, who grew up and lived their own lives, have been forgotten, or has scarcely received any attention. Only a few personal testimonies with painful memories were published, often in literary form. This memorialization changed, when the generation of former hidden children reached their retirement age. Since the late 1980s, and especially in the 1990s, the subject has been examined increasingly, primarily (auto-) biographically. The establishment of organizations like the “Hidden Child Foundation” (1991 in New York) or the “Child Holocaust Survivors” (1991 in Poland) has had a significant impact on this process.
The German Historical Institute in Warsaw will hold a workshop on this issue in Kaunas, Lithuania, on June 25-27, 2018 in cooperation with The International Centre for Litvak Photography. This location has been chosen intentionally, as a significant number of children were hidden in Kaunas and its surroundings during the war. In the Soviet times, in Lithuania, Sofija Binkienė who, along with her family, hid Jewish children from the Kaunas Ghetto, published an important contribution on this topic, titled Soldiers without Guns. This book contained the memories of the protectors and their hidden children. This workshop aims to revisit and reclaim the stories of the hidden children in the respective countries and to examine the impacts of their hiding experiences for their postwar lives. For this workshop, we encourage all participants to present their newest research on this topic. We particularly welcome papers, which introduce unknown source material, develop new concepts or methods, and explore the history of hidden children via a comparative, multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary approach.

We invite scholars representing historical disciplines and other social sciences to submit proposals under one of the topics mentioned above.

The workshop will be organized by: 
Prof. Dr. Ruth Leiserowitz, German Historical Institute, Warsaw and Dr. des. Gintarė Malinauskaitė, German Historical Institute, Warsaw / Branch Office Vilnius
The workshop will be hold in English.
Abstract proposals of no less than 250 and no more than 500 words with a short bio should be sent to: leiserowitz@dhi.waw.pl; malinauskaite@dhi.lt
Deadline for submitting abstracts: 31 January 2018 
Notification of acceptance: 28 February 2018 
Conference dates: 25-27 June 2018
Conference venue: Kaunas, Lithuania

For further information, please contact:

Prof. Dr. Ruth Leiserowitz or Dr. des. Gintarė Malinauskaitė,
Deutsches Historisches Institut Warschau
E-Mail: leiserowitz@dhi.waw.pl ; malinauskaite@dhi.lt

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Dr. Ruth Leiserowitz
E-mail: leiserowitz@dhi.waw.pl
Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Philadelphia

Description

After Vienna. Post-Imperial Salzburg as Austria’s Future Kulturstadt 1919-1938

Confronted with Habsburg institutions imploded, economic and cultural distribution networks shattered, and infrastructure destroyed, leaders of the First Republic found themselves forced to rebuild the Austrian state. But as Anton Pelinka has recently observed, Austria did inherit from its Habsburg predecessor, the ability to imagine itself as a cultural superpower. Most notably, the Salzburg Festspiele emerged in the 1920s and 30s as the premier international Austrian cultural event, a reputation that continues today. We are calling for papers to contribute to a volume of essays that consider the many efforts to reshape post-imperial Salzburg as a future Kulturstadt, a second center of gravity, after Vienna, poised to capitalize on the new cultural, economic, and political realities after 1918.

Little research has been done to examine this development. For if Vienna was the “loser” within the borders of the new First Republic, Salzburg was the winner. Indeed, between 1910 and 1939 Vienna lost 15 % of its population, while Salzburg grew by 37.5%, the greatest increase of any Austrian city during that time frame. On the new banknotes issued by the First Republic, Salzburg was the only city to be featured as a motif besides Vienna. No longer on the margins of the Habsburg lands, Salzburg stood at one end of an East-West axis that traversed Austria. What was the Salzburg alternative, a harkening back to former glory or did propose something new? Was it reactionary or modern?

By some measures, to be sure, Salzburg was an unusual choice to project the new place for Austria in the world. Regional capitals, Graz and Klagenfurt, were larger and had participated more fully in modernization, while Graz and Innsbruck could offer universities with several faculties. But like the Habsburg state before it, the First Austrian Republic sought to project its power in ways that combined culture and geopolitics. Indeed, Salzburg presented a weak situation for upgrading but a much more symbolically important one for national identity. For if the Socialists ruled Vienna, a coalition of Black Christian Socials and other conservatives controlled the federal government -- a control that from 1920 to 1934 they never relinquished. For the Christian Socials, Salzburg would represent their vision of Austria. Situated along an ascendant European North-South axis, it would be an urban setting inflected by folk and Catholic culture, a political and cultural counterweight to Red Vienna.

Salzburg itself internalized stereotypes about itself and sought to present these back to tourists and others, while also cultivating a local self-image greatly shaped by its opposition to the Viennese. This dynamic served both as an engine of innovation and encouraged German National and anti-Semitic ideologies. With a municipal government precariously balanced throughout the 1920s, Salzburg struggled to reconcile a retooled Austrian cosmopolitan identity and German National sympathies. In the 1930s, the former was increasingly sacrificed to the latter, as pan-German and National Socialist cadres utilized Salzburg’s vicinity to the German border. To what extent, was the Salzburg “high culture” project of the First Republic part of the problem?

Scholarship has traditionally seen the First Republic as the state that “no one wanted,” a place where thinking about the future converged only on competing visions of the apocalypse. This volume considers Salzburg as an Austrian project oriented towards the future, and its chapters seek to provide a reevaluation of the First Republic by exploring forms of symbolic thinking, plans and initiatives around the rising Austrian Kulturstadt of Salzburg.

POSSIBLE TOPICS
- Geopolitics -- New regional, cultural and political connections with 
Munich Italy, and others. Physical reconfigurations that express new vision of Salzburg: architecture, planning, transportation infrastructure. 
- Salzburg Festival -- Experiments in post-imperial identity; festival as supranational cultural mission; high culture as instrument of political diplomacy, national self-assertion, and propaganda.
- Film and Film Industry -- Global self-positioning; Austrian generic hybrids; Salzburg-Hollywood-Salzburg; cinema networks; individuals.
- Jewish Identity in Salzburg after 1918 -- Between religious tradition, high culture, and folkloric fashionings; cultural and political anti-semitism; Sommerfrische and science.
- Modern Music -- International Society for Contemporary Music; International Performances of Chamber Music (1922) [Internationale Kammermusik-Aufführungen], counter-initiatives to Salzburg Festival and Salzburg as new music city; post-1933 rivalries between twelve-tone and pro-National Socialist composers; neo-Romanticism. 
- Mozarteum -- Cultural icon, symbol of elite culture ambitions, and great hope of forces opposed to Vienna; university substitute and anti-university; high-art flag bearer for Christian Socialists, German Nationals, and "German-genius" school of Nazis on both sides of border.
- Cultural and Political Associations (Verbände); individual and institutional power-brokers and intermediaries, including transnational pan-German and later National Socialist organizations that built networks Salzburg, Munich, and Vienna.
- Salzburg and First Republic State Branding -- sports, skiing, Alpine Republic, tourism. 
- Tracht, Volkstümlichkeit and Its Mobilization in Popular and Political Culture -- habitus, Salzburg flair, self-styling, and folk costume retailored as both national/regional uniform and high-civic and evening attire.

EDITORS
Robert Dassanowsky, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs 
Michael Burri, Temple University

DEADLINES
- Abstract of proposed chapter (300 words): 31 January 2018 
- Response to authors: 15 March 2018
- Completed chapters due: 15 August 2018

Authors should submit their 300-word proposal and three-sentence biography statement to the editors (rvondass@uccs.edu, michael.burri@temple.edu). Proposal and statement may be in English or German. Expected article length 6,000-8,000 words, including notes and bibliography. Final paper submissions must be in English.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Michael Burri
E-mail: michael.burri@temple.edu
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: University of Leeds

Transnational War Volunteering: From Garibaldi to the Cold War

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Leeds, UK

Description

Transnational War Volunteering: From Garibaldi to the Cold War
10.07.2018 - 11.07.2018
University of Leeds

In the second half of the nineteenth century and in the early twentieth century supporters of Giuseppe Garibaldi volunteered their services and took part in the Polish uprising of 1863, the Cretan revolt of 1866-1867, the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871, the Herzegovina uprising of 1875, the Greco-Turkish War of 1896 and the First Balkan War of 1912-1913. A cohort of transnational Garibaldini volunteers also fought for France in 1914-1915 and the name of Garibaldi was once again invoked by the International Brigades during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). In many ways, Garibaldinism served as a bridge between different radical political creeds: anarchism, socialism and, later on, communism.

The conference seeks to explore traditions of transnational military engagement associated with political radicalism and the legacy of Garibaldi as well as to examine how practices of volunteering to fight against colonial occupation and perceived oppression continued into the Cold War.

We particularly encourage papers dealing with the participation of foreign volunteers in anti-colonial and/or Cold War conflicts in post-1945 Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. Enquiries and proposals of up to 300 words (in English)

A keynote lecture will be given by Professor Lucy Riall (European University Institute). Limited funds will be available to help pay for the travel expenses of participants, with preference given to early career researchers.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Enrico Acciai
E-mail: e.acciai@leeds.ac.uk
Website: https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/837442/cfp-transnational-war-volunteering-garibaldi-cold-war
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Oral History Association

Oral History in Our Challenging Times

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Description

Oral History Association

2018 Annual Meeting

October 10-13, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

Submission deadline: January 31, 2018

 

The Oral History Association invites proposals for papers and presentations for its 2018 annual meeting co-hosted by Concordia University. The meeting will be held October 10-13 on the campus of Concordia in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

As oral historians we explore and analyze how our interviews are shaped by the current climate and context that surrounds us when we record our stories.  We also believe that contemporary conversations can and will shape our annual meeting.  Events in the past year have reaffirmed OHA’s commitment to actively cultivating our organization as a space to fight inequality.  As oral historians and as members of OHA we “remain committed to documenting personal narratives of complex and diverse histories” and have reaffirmed our fundamental values of respect, empowerment, diversity, engagement, and inclusion.  We continue our long-time commitment to the development of projects, the creation of annual meeting panels, published works, and artistic expressions that bring to the forefront global stories that “might not be included in the historical record.”  (For more see OHA’s Statement on Diversity and Inclusion). This has also led us to advocate for an ever broadening range of methods of storytelling and presentation. Social difference often emerges in the context of the interview itself: young interviewing old, women interviewing men, outsiders interviewing members of a community or culture, just to name a few. We imagine the 2018 annual meeting to harness the power of oral history these challenging times.

Montreal, Quebec, Canada provides an exciting location to focus on and highlight all the innovative and exciting oral history work taking place in the Americas and, especially, in Montreal itself.  Because Montreal is culturally and linguistically an international city it makes an ideal place to engage in oral history conversations about our role in a global context and build conversations between the United States, Latin America, and Canada. Our host institution, Concordia’s Center for Oral History and Digital Storytelling, has its strengths in the intersection of oral history and performance, place-based storytelling, visual arts, and participatory media.  We want conference presenters and attendees to see and experience the neighborhoods and communities where Montreal’s oral and public history work takes place.  We hope the site of the conference and the work of local oral historians will inspire our members and others to propose sessions that engage in oral history with a creative and artistic approach.

Moreover, it’s fitting that fifty years after “the year of protest” we should gather in a global city like Montreal.  Massive demonstrations took place in Paris, Poland, the United States, Mexico, and other major cities around the world in 1968.  Quebec too saw its own protests that year.  Students, workers, and young people worldwide spoke out against capitalism, consumerism, for free speech, against dictatorships, for student rights and affordable tuition, for civil rights, and against the Vietnam War. In the spirit of 1968, we encourage proposals that use oral history and storytelling to illuminate these protests or other movements for social change across the globe from the 1960s to today.

The Program Committee welcomes broad and creative interpretations of the conference theme.  We especially encourage presenters to think about innovative delivery models including dramatic performance, interactive sessions, and the use of digital media.  In addition, we welcome proposals from the diverse communities that carry out oral history work – academics, independent scholars, activists, librarians, museum curators, web designers, teachers, community historians, documentary film producers, artists, creative writers, ethnographers, public historians, and others whose work relates to this year’s conference theme.

We hope to have a significant international presence at the meeting and particularly welcome proposals that highlight oral history work in the Americas outside the United States. If accepted, international presenters may apply for partial scholarships, made available by OHA in support of international presentations. Small scholarships are also available for accepted presenters and others who attend the meeting.

 

Concordia University is one of two Anglophone universities in Montreal and, as such, English is the primary language of instruction and communication. English will be the primary language of OHA 2018. To honor Montreal's bi-cultural heritage, however, and to give a space for oral history scholars from across the Americas, we are happy to take some proposals in French, Spanish and Portugese. Either consecutive or simultaneous interpretation will be provided for a limited number of presentations.

 

Proposal Queries may be directed to:

Steve Estes, 2018 Program Co-chair
Sonoma State University, email:  steve.estes@sonoma.edu

Amy Starecheski, 2018 Program Co-chair
Columbia University Oral History MA Program, email: aas39@columbia.edu

Natalie Fousekis, 2017-2018 OHA Vice-President
Lawrence de Graaf Center for Oral and Public History, email: nfousekis@fullerton.edu

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Steve Estes
E-mail: steve.estes@sonoma.edu
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: International Intelligence History Association

New Perspectives on the Role of Intelligence in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: Graz

Description

New Perspectives on the Role of Intelligence in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe
08.06.2018 - 10.06.2018

The Center for Intelligence, Propaganda and Security Studies (ACIPSS) of Graz University will host the 2018 Annual Conference of the International Intelligence History Association (IIHA). The conference will be held on June 8-10, 2018, at the Bildungshaus Mariatrost in the historic city of Graz, capital of the Austrian region of Styria. The theme of the conference will be “New Perspectives on the Role of Intelligence in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe”.
Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe have experienced several transitions and transformations since World War I. The fall of empires led to new paths for state and nation-building, often based on ideological orientation and choice: fascist, communist and western democratic. Old but also new patterns of security and insecurity emerged, highlighting the need for security at home and alertness abroad. As a consequence, intelligence in its broadest sense became a major ingredient in politics and diplomacy, both at the level of the nation-state and of the society of states.
In the year 2018, a century of nigh on revolutionary developments in matters of intelligence calls for new historical assessment and comparison. Thus the conference organizers are seeking original papers dealing with all aspects relating to intelligence issues in these regions, including but not limited to case studies on the experiences of individual countries and/or regional blocs, including non-governmental actors. They also specifically invite papers on comparative intelligence historiography on these regions. The period covered is from the Austro-Hungarian Empire until today.
We especially encourage paper proposals from young researchers and doctoral students, as well as from established scholars and former practitioners.
Please submit your panel or paper proposal abstract of 200-300 words and your detailed CV by email to the IIHA Executive Director Anna Abelmann at: exec_director@intelligence-history.org 
The deadline for proposal submissions is January 31, 2018. Notifications of acceptance will go out by the end of February 2018. Conference presenters are invited to submit their revised paper in form of an article to the Association’s Journal of Intelligence History (JIH) or to ACIPSS’ Journal for Intelligence, Propaganda and Security Studies (JIPSS).
The IIHA is one of the oldest and largest associations in the field of intelligence studies, with members from dozens of countries in all five continents. Our annual conferences are the central place for presenting new research and meeting leading intelligence scholars, experts and colleagues from all over the world. Further information is available on our websites www.intelligence-history.org and http://www.acipss.org.

Partners
University of Graz (ACIPPS)

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Anna Abelmann
E-mail: exec_director@intelligence-history.org
Website: http://www.intelligence-history.org/
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: University of Warwick

Unveiling Hidden Discourses: 1968 Fifty Years Later

Deadline: 31-01-2018
Location: University of Warwick

Description

Unveiling Hidden Discourses: 1968 Fifty Years Later

A one-day interdisciplinary conference, Saturday 19th May 2018
2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of 1968, when social unrest and desire to change the status quo struck the world. Our interdisciplinary conference, titled “Unveiling Hidden Discourses: 1968 Fifty Years Later,” looks at this year and to evaluate its lasting consequences, in both negative and positive senses. The conference’s aim is twofold. First, the conference will demonstrate what happens when unacceptable discourses refuse to remain unacceptable on a global scale and social implications that follow accordingly. Second, the conference will analyse 1968’s legacy and how social movements were manifested in different expressions, such as cultural production, policy and ontological understanding. Examples of such expressions were illustrated through theatre, the Civil Rights Act and pro-feminist demonstrations. It will also consider failures of 1968 movements and how this allowed for the establishment of extreme right-wing parties, such as the Front National in France following “mai 68.” Critical questions include: How can this year’s impact be considered through a transnational lens? Has this global movement been translated into social developments? Do different disciplines demonstrate ways social movements can inspire change? We ultimately intend to showcase how social movements associated with 1968 impacted citizens’ lives on a transnational level.


This conference seeks to create a new understanding of 1968, highlighting common themes that emerge by analysing intersections of various academic disciplines and presenting global perspectives of this year, which is mostly viewed as a European phenomenon. We intend to collaborate with scholars from diverse fields, such as History, Theatre Studies and Modern Languages, in order to deepen our comprehension of this key date. Our motive as researchers to organize this conference is to commemorate the anniversary of 1968 as well as to connect with other researchers to identify cultural, social and political implications that have developed in response to events in 1968. This project’s originality lies in its use of a transnational and interdisciplinary lens to view this year’s historic impact, thus providing a new framework to consider the resonance of 1968 and the first fifty years afterwards.

 Call for Papers

Unveiling Hidden Discourses: 1968 Fifty Years Later

An interdisciplinary conference at the University of Warwick

Keynote speakers: Professor Anne Etienne (UCC) and Professor Maud Anne Bracke (University of Glasgow)

Saturday, 19th May 2018

2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of 1968, when social unrest and desire to change the status quo struck the world. Our interdisciplinary conference, titled “Unveiling Hidden Discourses: 1968 Fifty Years Later,” looks at this year and evaluates its lasting consequences, in both negative and positive senses.

The conference’s aim is twofold:

To demonstrate what happens when unacceptable discourses refuse to remain unacceptable on a global scale and social implications that follow accordingly.
To analyse 1968’s legacy and how social movements were manifested in different expressions, such as cultural production, policy and ontological understanding. Examples of such expressions were illustrated through theatre, the Civil Rights Act and pro-feminist demonstrations.
Paper proposals that intend to showcase how social movements associated with 1968 impacted citizens’ lives on a transnational level. As a guide to submissions, we would ask that you consider the following questions:

How can this year’s impact be considered through a transnational lens?
Has this global movement been translated into social developments?
Do different disciplines demonstrate ways social movements can inspire change?
We welcome papers from all disciplines including but not limited to:

Gender studies
Political Science
Comparative Literature
History
Modern Languages
Law
Sociology
Philosophy
Submissions should consist of an abstract (up to 300 words), including a title and a short biography. They are to be sent to Mary Jane Dempsey and Rebecca Infield via Hiddendiscourses1968@gmail.com by 31 January 2018.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-01-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Mary Jane Dempsey and Rebecca Infield
E-mail: Hiddendiscourses1968@gmail.com
Website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/hrc/confs/1968/
Project / event type: conference / symposium
Organiser: Research Network on Christianity, Culture and Soci

The effects of World War I on the Christian Churches in Europe (1918-1925)

Deadline: 01-02-2018
Location: Rome, Italy

Description

The effects of World War I on the Christian Churches in Europe (1918-1925)
12.11.2018 - 14.11.2018

11 November 1918 saw the end of the First World War, known at the time as the ‘Great War’ (1914-1918) for its global scale, extreme destructivity and unseen casualty rates. On the one hand, wars evoke heroism and patriotism and bring people and groups to alter their mental boundaries and abilities. On the other hand, wars also elicit hatred, envy and violent behaviour, the settling of hidden accounts, the abandonment of ethical standards, and deep divisions and confrontations between families and societies. Since effects of the first world conflict were enormous and the shock waves were felt for years and generations to come, the question arises about the impact of the Great War on religion and the established churches.

The workshop The Effects of World War I on the Christian Churches in Europe (1918-1925) will adopt an international comparative approach to study the effects of the Great War on the institutionalized Christian religions (eg. Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox churches) in the immediate aftermath of the war. How did the churches perceive the war and the immediate post-war period? What was the impact on Christian theology and culture? How did the churches interact with the belligerent nation states and how did they cope with the changing (geo)political situation after the war? What were their ecclesiological, pastoral and liturgical challenges after the armistices? Did they adopt a defensive stance towards secularization, or did they intensified their dialogue with modernity? To what extent did they move towards a pastoral policy of social healing and offer a welcome to Christian pacifism and ecumenism?

The workshop wishes to stimulate innovative research on the interaction between religion and society in the difficult years between the end of the war and the mid-1920’s. It explicitly adopts an interdenominational and international comparative perspective, stimulating a multifaceted and in-depth analysis, with due attention to methodological questions and combining the results of different fields of historical research: the history of churches and religions, cultural, intellectual, social and political history, etc. Although well-chosen case-studies focusing, for instance, on particular regional/national contexts, on specific denominations, organizations or individuals can surely offer valuable insights, the organizers especially aim for papers that deal with the issues concerned from a broad comparative perspective. They should contribute to a better understanding of the changing nature of religious culture across Europe. Although the workshop will deal in particular with the immediate post-war years (1918-mid 1920’s), contributors are encouraged to adopt a broader chronological perspective of continuity and discontinuity in evaluating the results of their analysis for the period at hand.

The workshop will bring together senior academics as well as junior doctoral researchers in a scientific dialogue on the subject. Introductory keynote lectures from established researchers and thematic sessions will structure the multi-layered perspective as well as the comparative baseline.

POSSIBLE THEMES (to be finalized after the evaluation of the paper proposals)

The old and the new world: Did Christian churches harbour a silent nostalgia for the old world of ‘multi-ethnic and multi-religious empires, such as the Ottoman or Habsburg empires’? Did they see challenges and opportunities for religion and meaning in the new post-war world with new upcoming nation-states? What was their attitude, impact and role with regard to the new geopolitical constellation, nationalism and the new states, the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations, and the growing international culture of consultation?

The masses or the elites: How did denominations deal with the post-war emergence of the masses, popular democracy and women’s movements, as well as with new socio-economic (fascist and communist) ideologies? How were these evolutions related to the earlier events of the war? Did churches consider these changes as new opportunities or, was it the opposite, a question of offering resistance to an engulfing modernity by creating a counterculture of and with the old/new elites?

Affiliation and/or de-affiliation to the churches: How was the post-war faith and religious culture influenced by the events of war? Did these processes reflect a changing view of God and humanity, and/or an eschatological vision and cultural pessimism? How representative are the conversion stories of the 1920s – for example, of intellectuals and artists - and how did the churches deal with them? The workshop will also examine changing religious imagination and practices, both private and public. Since previous workshops and conferences have already focused intensely on the impact of the Great War on religious material culture (architecture, art and iconography, …) this topic will not be discussed.

Internal and/or external missionary work: In the long nineteenth century the Christian churches – pre-eminently the Catholic and Protestant churches – were characterized by a worldwide missionary offensive. The question must be asked about the extent to which the Great War had an impact on the missionary enterprise (missiology, strategies, intensity, methodologies ...)? Was the emphasis henceforth spread more evenly between internal and external missionary work? What were the effects on the missionary institutes and/or associations ? How did they deal with growing self-awareness in mission areas.

Distrust and/or mutual understanding and encouragement of ecumenism/dialogue. To what extent the mutual relations between the Christian churches changed as result of the war? Did it engender greater openness, ecumenism or did bitter distrust prevail? How did it affect ethnic and religious tensions in for instance the Balkans and Eastern Europe?

VENUE

MONDAY 12 NOVEMBER: Academia Belgica – Via Omero
TUESDAY 13 NOVEMBER: École Française de Rome – Piazza Navona
WEDNESDAY 14 NOVEMBER (UNTIL 14 P.M.): Österreichisches Historisches Institut in Rom - Viale Bruno Buozzi

ORGANIZING INSTITUTES
Research network on Christianity, Culture and Society in
Contemporary Europe (CCSCE) and KADOC-KU Leuven

In cooperation with:

Pontifical Committee of Historical Sciences (PCHS)
Academia Belgica, Rome (AB)
École Française de Rome (EFR)
Österreichisches Historisches Institut in Rom (OHIR)
Deutsches Historisches Institut in Rom (DHIR)

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Bernard Ardura (PCHS)
Martin Baumeister (CCSCE, DHIR)
Wouter Bracke (AB)
Kim Christiaens (KADOC-KU Leuven)
Jan De Maeyer (KADOC-KU Leuven)
Jan De Volder (KU Leuven)
Andreas Gottsmann (OHIR)
Peter Heyrman (KADOC-KU Leuven)
Fabrice Jesné (EFR)

Secretary: Kristien Suenens (KADOC-KU Leuven)

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

Bernard Ardura (PCHS)
Martin Baumeister (CCSCE, DHIR)
Annette Becker (Université Paris Nanterre)
Philippe Chenaux (PCHS, Pontificia Universitas Lateranensis)
Kim Christiaens (KADOC-KU Leuven)
Wilhelm Damberg (Commission für Zeitgeschichte, Ruhr Universität Bochum)
Jan De Maeyer (KADOC-KU Leuven)
Jan De Volder (KU Leuven)
Philip Jenkins (Baylor University)
Fabrice Jesné (EFR)
Peter Heyrman (KADOC-KU Leuven)
Emilia Hrabovec (PCHS, Comenius University Bratislava)
Daniele Menozzi (CCSCE, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
Rupert Klieber (Universität Wien)
George Harinck (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
Giovanni Vian (CCSCE,Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia)
Claus Arnold (CCSCE, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz)
Philippe Portier (CCSCE, EPHE Paris-Sorbonne)
Adriano Roccucci (Università degli Studi Roma Tre)

Secretary: Kristien Suenens (KADOC-KU Leuven)

PROPOSALS

The conference language will be English.

The organizers prefer that abstracts and papers are submitted in English, the main conference language. Contributions in French or Italian will nonetheless be taken into consideration too.

Proposals should be submitted as PDF documents and should contain the following: a clear title of the proposed paper; a summary (max. 500 words), outlining the paper’s goals, methodology and source materials; CV(s) of author(s), with contact information, position and institutional affiliation.

These abstracts should be attached and emailed to the workshop secretary (kristien.suenens@kadoc.kuleuven.be) no later than 1 February 2018. You should receive a confirmation of proposal receipt within 48 hours.

The proposals will be evaluated and selected by the Scientific Committee based on topic relevance, innovativeness and the degree to which the proposal answers the call. Notification of the evaluation will occur no later than 1 April 2018.

Full papers should be sent to the workshop organizers no later than 1 October 2018.

Conference speakers will pay no registration fee. The organizers will arrange their accommodation and catering for a maximum of three nights (Sunday until Wednesday). We trust that invited speakers will be able to find funding at their home institution or at other national instances to cover their travel costs. The organizers can provide a few grants to cover them partly, especially for junior researchers. They need to explicitly apply when sending their paper abstract.

PUBLICATION

Following the workshop, papers selected by referees will be included in an international, peer-reviewed publication, planned in 2020.

Partners
Research Network on Christianity, Culture and Society; KADOC-KULeuven; Pontifical Committee of Historical Sciences; Academia Belgica; Ecole Française de Rome; Österreichisches historisches Institut in Rom; Deutsches Historisches Institut in Rom

Basic information:
Deadline: 01-02-2018

Contat details:
Coordinator: Kristien Suenens
E-mail: kristien.suenens@kadoc.kuleuven.be
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