Project / event type: publication
Organiser: Studia Historiae Scientiarum

CFA: 1918 and the Search for New Internationalism in Central European Academia

Deadline: 31-05-2017
Location: -

Description

CFA: 1918 and the Search for New Internationalism in Central European Academia

(Call for Papers for a thematic section in Studia Historiae Scientiarum 2018)

When the war ended in 1918, scholars in Central Europe faced a new challenge. New states required not only new infrastructure but also new ideas on how science should function. The intellectual landscape was changing rapidly – new institutions in new states mushroomed, but also disappeared or went into hiding like the institutions of the new minorities. Internationally, the German language was under fire, losing in the 1920s its status as the language of international organizations – because German was often the preferred language of international communication for CEE scholars, this affected them as well.

One of the issues discussed most was how to present CEE science internationally while at the same time preserving its national character. Olympic internationalism, as Geert Somsen termed it, was one of the possibilities, with Central European scholars taking also leading roles in transnational organizations such as the Committee on Intellectual Co-operation.

Papers should interrogate the issue of imagining and maneuvering international scholarly networks and infrastructures. They are not limited to but should seek answers to such questions as:

What were the strategies pursued to present scholarship in the international fora? How was the issue of nationality, internationality and transnationality debated in connection to the reorganization of state scholarly infrastructure?
With what agendas and interests did CEE scholars enter international and transnational scholarly institutions? Did they try to influence the policies of these organizations in favor of their states’ agendas, or were they perhaps acting with new transnationalism in mind. How did their imperial experience influence it.
How did CEE scholars react to the limitation of German as the language of international organizations and conferences?
What was the role of the Soviet Union in the post-1918 international and transnational imagination? With politics favoring technical-scientific progress, the SU was growingly a major player in CEE, disavowed, however, for political and cultural-historical reasons by many intellectual key players. Did a particular socialist-communist internationalism develop?
We invite the submission of abstracts on the questions and topics raised above. Please send an abstract of no more than 500 words and a short biographical sketch to jan.surman@gmail.com.

The editors will ask the authors of selected papers to submit their final articles no later than February 28th 2018. The articles will be published after a peer-review process.

Studia Historiae Scientiarum is a peer-reviewed, diamond open access journal devoted to the history of science. For more information visit: http://www.ejournals.eu/Studia-Historiae-Scientiarum/ .

The deadline for the submission of abstracts: May 31th 2017.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 31-05-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: -
E-mail: jan.surman@gmail.com
Website: http://www.ejournals.eu/Studia-Historiae-Scientiarum/
Project / event type: publication
Organiser: Studies in Eastern European Cinema Special Issue

cfp: Popular Music and the Moving Image in Eastern Europe

Deadline: 15-06-2017
Location: -

Description

Popular Music and the Moving Image in Eastern Europe
Studies in Eastern European Cinema Special Issue

Deadline: 15 June 2017

A special issue of Studies in Eastern European Cinema calls for contributions (not exceeding 6000 words) on the uses of popular music in the moving image in Eastern Europe – including musicals, other types of fiction film, music videos, documentary and experimental films – from the postwar period to contemporary times. The focus includes but also reaches beyond poetic considerations of film music, and articles about the social, cultural, and production contexts of music in screen culture are especially welcome.

During the period of state socialism the moving image was an important tool of promoting music in the respective countries and creating popular cinema. At the same time, prejudice towards popular culture resulted in neglect of this type of production by both the authorities and scholars. Most importantly, filmmakers specialising in musicals had a lower status than the countries’ leading ‘auteurs’ and there was almost no scholarly attention devoted to music videos. However, after the fall of state socialism musicals have fared better, often being used as a vehicle to convey postcommunist nostalgia. Moreover, many leading directors engaged in producing music videos; it became a sign of their professionalism and prestige. This is reflected in recent research on Eastern European musicals and music videos, although typically in local languages, rather than English.

In the early period of state socialism musical films tend to present utopian socialist communities exemplified by the Hungarian Life is Beautiful If You Sing Along (1950) and the Polish Adventure on Marienstadt (1954). From the 1960s popular music and star performers were featured more openly in films targeting teenagers right across the Eastern Europe, ranging from Romania (A Charming Girl (1966), through Hungary These Youngsters! (1967) to Czechoslovakia, where Jan Němec’s Martyrs of Love (1966) and Jiří Menzel’s Crime in a Nightclub (1968). In some films from the late 1960s popular music also signified political protest and infection with western culture. With the passage of time, as authoritarian control over popular culture eased and western cultural products were easier to obtain, the music element became more prominent in film as demonstrated by including members of local music scenes and a burgeoning music video culture. With the neoliberal transformation and the emerging free market, popular culture achieved full legitimacy and specific Eastern European ethno pop genres gained more screen presence. The use of music inspired screen culture either began to compete with global trends, often at the cost of aesthetic self-colonization, or tried to establish its autonomy by revitalizing local traditions of folksy-ness as demonstrated by Polish disco polo, Romanian manele, Bulgarian chalga, Serbian turbo folk or the Bosnian sevdalinka. Another key area where the music-cinema interface produced uniquely Eastern European phenomena are music films – including Jan Hrebejk’s Big Beat (1993), Filip Renc’s Rebelove (2001), Péter Tímár’s Dollybirds (1997), Leander Haussmann’s Sonnenalle (1999) and Gergely Fonyó’s Made in Hungaria (2008) – that look back on the state-socialist past with beat and rockabilly their focus.

This cross-disciplinary issue is meant to fill a gap in the research by examining the relationship between popular music and the moving image in fiction films, including musicals, music videos, documentaries and experimental films. Possible topics of articles include:

- The poetics and politics of musicals under state socialism
- Post-socialist musicals and nostalgia
- Western and eastern influences on Eastern European music films
- Politicized/depoliticized screen representations of popular music
- Representations of local music scenes, performers, bands in cinema
- The use of popular music in experimental films
- Production contexts of musicals and music videos
- Music video and video-inspired films from/about Eastern Europe
- Transnational patterns in music videos regarding form and content
- Screening local social and cultural environments in music videos
Submission Instructions

Please send 200 word proposals for papers with short bios to gyorizs@yahoo.co.uk or Ewa Mazierska to EHMazierska@uclan.ac.uk by 15 June 2017. The deadline for full articles is 15 October 2017.

Editorial information
Guest Editor : Zsolt Győri (gyorizs@yahoo.co.uk)
Editor-in-Chief : Ewa Mazierska (EHMazierska@uclan.ac.uk)

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 15-06-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Zsolt Győri
E-mail: gyorizs@yahoo.co.uk
Website: http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/ah/reec-cfp-pop-music
Project / event type: publication
Organiser: Forum Kritika

Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue

Deadline: 30-06-2017
Location: -

Description

Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue
Dealing with the Past: Mapping the Edges of “Historical Dialogue”

Historical dialogue is a growing field of scholarship and practice that engages with the legacy of historical violence and its ties to contemporary politics. It is informed by the recognition that many contemporary conflicts germinate from the memory of past violence, and it is particularly pertinent for the field of conflict transformation and prevention in conflict and post-conflict societies. By its very nature, then, historical dialogue is multidisciplinary, taking place within academic disciplines as well as (but not exclusively) with law, journalism, education, film, art, and literature. As a result, while the term “historical dialogue” has been used in a range of contexts—in scholarship, practice-based research, political interventions, among others—differences persist regarding the precise conceptualization of the term.

The Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue seeks to map the edges of the field, to disentangle the different readings of the expression “historical dialogue” along disciplinary, regional, religious, ethnic and class lines, to name but a few. While these questions are relevant for the term “historical dialogue” in and of itself, they have emerged in productive and compelling ways as a result of the digital humanities, “Mapping Historical Dialogues Project” (MHDP), developed at Columbia University, and part of the Historical Dialogues, Justice and Memory Network. The objective of this digital project is to map existing stakeholders who are engaged in historical dialogue and who use historical narrative to respond to drivers of conflict or as a means of conflict transformation. The project thus seeks to describe the impact that the memory of sectarian and national violence has on contemporary politics, to establish the norms of historical dialogue, and to explore how this knowledge facilitates work towards conflict transformation, reconciliation, peacebuilding, and democracy promotion, particularly in post-conflict countries.

And yet such goals beg the question of how to define “historical dialogue” in methodological and theoretical terms. This Forum Kritika thus seeks to understand how the term “historical dialogue” is used in different disciplines (e.g., political science, history, theology, literary studies, cultural studies, etc.), and what the relationship is between “historical dialogue” and certain regions or discursive environments. Other possible topics can consider the relationship between the concept of “historical dialogue” and its connection or intersection with terms such as transitional justice, memory studies, peace building, or conflict resolution. Is it designed as an alternative term and if so, what is its particular contribution in both academic and practical terms? In considering, for example, the differences between “historical dialogue” and transitional justice, should one define such differences in analytical terms or normative terms, or both? Additional topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the genealogy of the term “historical dialogue”—when and how it emerged, who has framed the term, and how it has been applied; the relationship between theory and practice regarding historical dialogue work; case studies (in particular, but not exclusively regarding initiatives that appear in the MHDP) and country studies; best practices and the impact of historical dialogue as a conflict transformation mechanism; and the relationship between historical dialogue and accountability.

Submission guidelines

Contributions should be 7,000 to 8,000 words (MLA style). Include the following elements in the submission: abstract (200 to 250 words); bionote (100 to 150 words); keywords (5 to 7); institutional affiliation and e-mail address. All contributions will undergo double blind peer review. Send contributions and inquiries to the guest editors of the Forum Kritika (cc: kk.soh@ateneo.edu):

            — Ariella Lang (al223@columbia.edu)

            — Dimitris Kousouris (dimkous@gmail.com)

Use the subject heading “Forum Kritika on Historical Dialogue.” Deadline is on June 30, 2017.

Kritika Kultura is a peer-refereed electronic journal (indexed in MLA, DOAJ, Scopus, and Thomson Reuters), which is devoted to the innovative, multidisciplinary study of language, literature, culture, and society.

Partners
-

Basic information:
Deadline: 30-06-2017

Contat details:
Coordinator: Forum Kritika
E-mail: kk.soh@ateneo.edu
Website: http://journals.ateneo.edu/ojs/index.php/kk/announcement/view/35