The Making and Re-Making of Europe: 1919–2019

    European Remembrance Symposium 2019

    27–29 May 2019, Paris

    The 8th edition of the European Remembrance Symposium entitled "The Making and Re-Making of Europe: 1919–2019" takes place in Paris at the Sorbonne University between 27 and 29 May.

    This year's European Remembrance Symposium is dedicated to the issue of how we deal with, narrate and remember decisive changes in the 20th-century history of Europe, such as the years 1919, 1945, 1989.

    In an attempt to promote interdisciplinary and cross-national perspectives, we invite professionals from various academic fields: history, politics, economy, culture and art to come to Paris to discuss ‘different European orders’ in the 20th century and their impact on contemporary societies.

     

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    VENUES

    Please note that there are two separate venues for the symposium:

    Day 1, Monday 27 May 2019
      Sessions: Amphithéâtre Oury, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
      Entrance at the 14, rue Cujas, 75005 Paris

    Days 2 and 3, Tuesday 28 May and Wednesday 29 May 2019
      Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
      Entrance at the 131, rue Saint-Jacques, 75005 Paris

    Registration


    Please note that the registration for the event has been now closed

    Please note that the general registration closes on 22 May.
    However, participants willing to apply for travel and / or accommodation reimbursement must register earlier, by 30 April. The number of reimbursements is limited.

    Programme

    8th European Remembrance Symposium

    27/05/2019 Monday

    12:30-14:00
    Registration
    Amphithéâtre Oury, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    14:00-14:15
    Opening Speech
    Amphithéâtre Oury, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    Rafał Rogulski (European Network Remembrance and Solidarity)
    Prof. Antoine Vauchez (European Centre for Sociology and Political Science, French National Centre for Scientific Research, University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France)
    14:15-16:15
    Opening session: Turning points in Europe’s order: conditions and consequences
    Amphithéâtre Oury, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    Rev. Prof. Piotr Mazurkiewicz (Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, Poland)
    Prof. Richard Overy (University of Exeter, United Kingdom)
    Prof. Adrian Pop (National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Romania)
    Prof. Arnold Suppan (Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria)
    Prof. Jay Winter (Yale University, USA)
    Moderator: Prof. Agnieszka Nogal (University of Warsaw, Poland)

    The discussion deals with the decisive historical changes that Europe faced in the past century, as epitomised by political arrangements such as the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, negotiations and agreements after the Second World War in 1945/1946 and after the collapse of Communist regimes in the aftermath of 1989. The session is addressed to reflect within a broad perspective on the issues of legitimacy and acceptance, reconciliation and antagonism as well as continuities and disruptions after these political decisions which established new orders for the continent.
    16:15-16:45
    Coffee break
    Galerie Soufflot, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    16:45-18:00
    Turbo presentations
    Amphithéâtre Oury, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    Would you like to showcase your latest project among peers from other countries?
    Or maybe you are you looking for partners for future initiatives?

    During turbo presentations we give the floor to our participants! Each speaker has up to 90 seconds to present their organisation or project to the audience of the Symposium.

    Apply to present at the turbo presentations
    18:00
    Reception dinner / cocktail gathering
    Galerie Soufflot, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

    28/05/2019 Tuesday

    9:15-10:00
    Registration
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    10:00-11:30
    1st session: Re-makings of Europe: new orders
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    English/French simultaneous translation provided

    Prof. Gabriele Della Morte (Catholic University of Milan, Italy)
    Prof. Chantal Delsol (Institut de France, France)
    Prof. Wanda Jarząbek (Institute of Political Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland)
    Moderator: Prof. Andres Kasekamp (University of Toronto, Canada)

    The session centres around the political consequences of decisive historical changes that Europe faced in the past century. The aim is to reflect on the impact of the new European settings at the time with regard to issues as border shifts, ethnicisation and nationalisation.
    11:30-12:00
    Coffee break
    Galerie Soufflot, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    12:00-13:30
    2nd session: New orders: trauma and recovery
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    English/French simultaneous translation provided

    Prof. Marie-Janine Calic (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany / ENRS)
    Prof. Catherine Horel (French National Centre for Scientific Research, France)
    Prof. Andrzej Nowak (Jagiellonian University, Poland / ENRS)
    Prof. Andrejs Plakans (Iowa State University, USA)
    Moderator: Dr Oldřich Tůma (Institute of Contemporary History of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic / ENRS)

    The session tackles the cultural consequences of the thresholds which Europe experienced in the last century. The discussion of this session deals with the impact of severe violence, atrocities and material loss on the formation of cultural and personal identity.
    13:30-14:15
    Book presentation: ‘Europe’s Postwar Periods – 1989, 1945, 1918. Writing History Backwards’
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    English/French simultaneous translation provided

    Dr Péter Apor (Research Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary)
    Prof. John Horne (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)
    Moderator: Prof. Piotr Biłos (National Institute for Oriental Languages and Civilizations, France)

    Well-known scholars from the European research consortium EURHISTXX reveal characteristics of the ‘making’ and ‘re-making’ of Europe in its long 20th century. By examining the history of Europe backwards – from the Cold War to the two World Wars – the book illustrates the aftermath of these key conflicts, arguing that post-war periods shaped Europe more than the wars themselves.
    14:15-15:00
    Lunch
    Galerie Soufflot, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    15:00-18:00/18:30
    Guided visits
    Paris, different venues
    Possible locations:
    Mémorial de la Shoah
    Kultura Paryska, Maisons-Laffitte
    Musée de l'Armée
    Historical guided tour of Paris
    evening
    accompanying event
    Embassy of Poland, 1, rue de Talleyrand
    opening of the "Wrocław Breaks the Iron Curtain" display by Zajezdnia History Centre

    29/05/2019 Wednesday

    9:15-10:00
    Registration
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    10:00-11:30
    3rd session: Re-makings of Europe: legacies on display
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    English/French simultaneous translation provided

    Dr Berber Hagedoorn (University of Groningen, the Netherlands)
    Prof. Aleksandra Hnatiuk (University of Warsaw, Poland / National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine)
    Prof. Anthony O'Hear (University of Buckingham, United Kingdom)
    Prof. Martin Pekár (Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Slovakia)
    Moderator: Prof. Andrzej Szczerski (Jagiellonian University, Poland)

    This session focuses on different approaches towards remembering decisive historical changes that Europe experienced in the 20th century. The aim is to discuss various media used to represent and remember crucial historical events shaping Europe’s setting.
    11:30-12:00
    Coffee break
    Galerie Soufflot, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    12:00-14:00
    Round table discussion: Century of change. Where do we stand now?
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    English/French simultaneous translation provided

    Prof. Rémi Brague (University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France / Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany)
    Prof. Marek Cichocki (Natolin European Centre, Poland)
    Prof. Chantal Delsol (Institut de France, France)
    Prof. Ferenc Miszlivetz (Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg, Hungary)
    Moderator: Markus Meckel (German Council on Foreign Relations / Federal Foundation for Reappraisal of Communism in Germany, Germany)

    The round table talk deals with the reoccurring echo of crucial political arrangements that several times re-shaped Europe’s order within the past century. While bearing in mind that these shifts still influence our life in manifold ways and that the shape of Europe faces ongoing changes that are not necessarily based on high-political and international legal agreements, the session aims at an open discussion to address following issues: How does Europe’s order presently look? Have we learned from these turning points in European history – if so: in what manner?
    14:00-14:15
    Closing remarks
    Amphithéâtre III, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
    English/French simultaneous translation provided

    Prof. Richard Overy (University of Exeter, United Kingdom)
    14:15
    Lunch and the end of the symposium
    Galerie Soufflot, Faculté de Droit – Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

    Speakers & Chairs

    Dr Péter Apor Dr Péter Apor

    Dr Péter Apor

    Péter Apor is a research fellow at the Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Between 2003 and 2011, he was a research fellow at the Central European University, Budapest, and an associate researcher at the University of Exeter (2008–2009). In 2012, he was a Fellow at the Imre Kertész Kolleg in Jena. His main research interests include the politics of memory and history in post-1945 East-Central Europe, the social and cultural history of the socialist dictatorships, and the history of historiography. He is the author of 'Fabricating Authenticity in Soviet Hungary: The Afterlife of the First Hungarian Soviet Republic in the Age of State Socialism' (2014).


    Prof. Piotr Biłos Prof. Piotr Biłos

    Prof. Piotr Biłos

    Piotr Biłos is head of the Polish section at the Institut des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (Inalco, National Institute for Oriental Languages and Civilizations), Paris, maître de conférences HDR. He spent his childhood in Algeria, Morocco and Poland and lives in Paris, Krakow and Warsaw. He is the author of 'Exile and modernity, towards a world-wide literature' (2012); ‘‘I’ Games, construction and deconstruction of the story in Wiesław Myśliwski’s novels’ (2016) and ‘Powieściowe Światy Wiesława Myśliwskiego’ (2017). He has just published a French edition of a complete history of Poland entitled ‘La Pologne, Fantaisie-Impromptu, Le prix de la République’ (2018). His interest in novels and, more broadly, narrative forms that rethink the link with the world through literature directs him towards a transnational approach of literary events.


    Prof. Rémi Brague Prof. Rémi Brague

    Prof. Rémi Brague

    Rémi Brague graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure. He is Emeritus Professor of Medieval and Arabic Philosophy at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, where he held the Romano Guardini chair. He was visiting professor at Pennsylvania State University (Visiting Associate Professor), Boston University (John Findlay Visiting Professor), Boston College (Hans-Georg Gadamer Visiting Professor), the Universidad de Navarra in Pamplona and University San Raffaele in Milan. He is a member of the Institut de France (Academy of Moral and Political Sciences) and is the author of 15 books.


    Prof. Marie-Janine Calic Prof. Marie-Janine Calic

    Prof. Marie-Janine Calic

    Marie-Janine Calic is Professor of East and South East European History at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany. Besides her permanent employment she worked and consulted for the Special Coordinator of the Stability Pact for South-Eastern Europe in Brussels, UNPROFOR-Headquarters in Zagreb, and the ICTY in The Hague. Her recent publications include: ‘The Great Cauldron. A History of Southeast Europe’ (2019); and ‘A History of Yugoslavia’ (2019). She is a regular commentator on Balkan affairs for the media. She has been a member of the ENRS Academic Council since April 2019.


    Prof. Marek Cichocki Prof. Marek Cichocki

    Prof. Marek Cichocki

    Marek Cichocki is the Curriculum Director of the European Centre in Natolin since 2004 as well as editor-in-chief of the magazine ‘New Europe. Natolin Review’. From 2007 to 2010 he was an Advisor to the President of the Republic of Poland and Sherpa for negotiation of the Lisbon Treaty. Since 2003, he has also been publisher and editor-in-chief of the ‘Teologia Polityczna’ yearly. He is permanent professor at the Collegium Civitas in Warsaw and visiting professor at the College of Europe Natolin. He is the author of many books, essays, articles and dissertations on international relations.


    Prof. Gabriele Della Morte Prof. Gabriele Della Morte

    Prof. Gabriele Della Morte

    Gabriele Della Morte is a lawyer and associate professor of international law at the Law Faculty of the Catholic University of Milan (Italy). He holds a PhD from the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne in cotutelle with the University of Palermo (2003) and a Law Degree from the University Federico II in Naples (1998). He has been an academic fellow at the Max Planck Institute for International, European and Regulatory Procedural Law, Luxembourg (2016) and has taught at the Académie de droit international humanitaire et de droits humains of Geneva (2007–2008) and the University of Naples L’Orientale (2004–2006). He is a lawyer on the List of Defence Counsel of the International Criminal Court, and author of various articles on international public law, cyber law and international criminal law etc. He has written two monographies on amnesty and international law and on big data and international human rights law. He has won the ‘Premio SIDI’ (Award of the Italian Society of International Law) for best article.

    Prof. Chantal Delsol Prof. Chantal Delsol

    Prof. Chantal Delsol

    Chantal Delsol is a political philosopher, novelist, editorial writer, professor emeritus of political philosophy at Paris-Est University and member of the Institut de France. She was a student of classical studies in Lyon, Ecole Chevreul and Lycée Saint-Just and graduated in philosophy and history of art at Lyon University. She defended her doctoral thesis in philosophy at Sorbonne in 1982 and became professor at the Marne-la-Vallée University in 1992. Through the university, she established the Hannah Arendt Research Institute in 1993. She created master-level programmes in Central and Eastern Europe. From 2008 to 2017, she headed the Observatory on Modernity at the Collège des Bernardins. In 2008, she was elected to the Institut de France, Academy of Moral and Political Sciences, where she served as president in 2015. She has been a member of the French Catholic Academy and is Doctor Honoris Causa from Babeş-Bolyai University since 2004 and Honorary Professor at the Ricardo Palma University since 2008. Since 1997, she also was a columnist writer for ‘Le Figaro; Valeurs Actuelles’ (until 2017) and currently writes for ‘L’Incorrect’. She supervises the collective publication of ‘The dictionnaire encyclopédique des auteurs d’Europe centrale et orientale depuis 1945’. Her work has been translated into more than 15 languages. She has published more than 200 articles in French and foreign journals.

    Dr Berber Hagedoorn Dr Berber Hagedoorn

    Dr Berber Hagedoorn

    Berber Hagedoorn is an assistant professor of Media Studies at the University of Groningen. Her research interests revolve around audio-visual culture, memory and heritage, creative reuse and storytelling across screens. She received the 2018 Europeana Research Grant award for digital humanities research into Europe’s cultural heritage. She is Vice-Chair of the ECREA (European Communication Research and Education Association) Television Studies section and organises cooperation for European research and education on television’s history and its future as a multi-platform storytelling practice. She has extensive experience in Media and Culture Studies and Digital Humanities through large-scale European and Dutch best practice projects on digital heritage and cultural memory representation, especially on digitised audio-visual heritage, including ‘Europeana’, ‘VideoActive’, ‘EUscreen’ and ‘CLARIAH’. She has published among others in Continuum; VIEW; Media and Communication; and Critical Studies in Television online.

    Prof. Aleksandra Hnatiuk Prof. Aleksandra Hnatiuk

    Prof. Aleksandra Hnatiuk

    Ola (Aleksandra) Hnatiuk is a professor at the Centre for East European Studies at the University of Warsaw and, since 2010, visiting professor at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in Kyiv. In 2001–2002, she was a Harvard University Ukrainian Research Institute Shklar Fellow. She served in the Polish diplomatic corps from 2006 to 2010 as First Counsellor, Head of the Education and Culture Section at the Embassy of Poland in Ukraine. She has received numerous awards, including ‘Polonia Restituta’ (Republic of Poland highest state award), and the Antonovych Foundation Award for fostering Polish-Ukrainian cultural cooperation. She received her PhD in Ukrainian literature in 1992 and habilitation in 2004 from the University of Warsaw. Her recent books include: ‘Farewell to the Empire. Ukrainian Debates on Identity at the Turn of XX and XXI Century’ (the book received the Jerzy Giedroyc Award in Humanities in 2004) and ‘Between Literature and Politics’ (selected essays, in Ukrainian, 2012); ‘Courage and Fear’ (2015). Her last book received numerous awards and nominations in Poland and Ukraine.

    Prof. Catherine Horel Prof. Catherine Horel

    Prof. Catherine Horel

    Catherine Horel is research director at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (C.N.R.S., French National Centre for Scientific Research), SIRICE, University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. She serves as Secretary General for the International Committee of Historical Sciences (CISH) and specialises in contemporary Central Europe. Her recent publications include: ‘Cette Europe qu’on dit centrale. Des Habsbourg à l’intégration européenne (1815–2004)’ (2009); ‘Les guerres balkaniques 1912–1913. Conflits, enjeux, mémoires’. (2014); ‘L'amiral Horthy. Régent de Hongrie’ (2014); (co-ed.) ‘Vaincus! Histoires de défaites. Europe XIXe–XXe siècles’ (2016) and (co-ed.) ‘Entrer en guerre: des Balkans au monde, 1914–1918’ (2018).


    Prof. John Horne Prof. John Horne

    Prof. John Horne

    John Horne is an historian, emeritus fellow and former Professor of Modern European History at Trinity College Dublin and member of the Royal Irish Academy. He is a board member of the Research Centre at the Museum of the Great War in Péronne, France. In 2016–2017, he was Leverhulme Visiting Professor at Oxford University. He is the author and editor of a number of books and over a hundred chapters and articles, many relating to the Great War. Among his latest publications are: (ed.) ‘A Companion to World War One’ (2010); (ed.) ‘Vers la guerre totale: le tournant de 1914–1915’ (2010); (with Robert Gerwarth) ‘War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War’ (2012); and ‘End of a Paradigm? The Cultural History of the Great War’ (2019).


    Prof. Wanda Jarząbek Prof. Wanda Jarząbek

    Prof. Wanda Jarząbek

    Wanda Jarząbek is professor at the Institute for Political Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. She specialises in political and social history of the 20th century, international relations, especially during the Cold War period, questions of memory and politics of memory. She is the author of articles, working papers and books on related topics. She was a visiting professor at Maison des sciences de l’homme in Paris, a visiting scholar at the Cold War International History Project (W. Wilson Center, Washington), as well as at the School of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University in Washington, the University of Eichstätt (Germany), the Herder Institute in Marburg, and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at London University.


    Prof. Andres Kasekamp Prof. Andres Kasekamp

    Prof. Andres Kasekamp

    Andres Kasekamp is a professor of history and chair of Estonian Studies at the University of Toronto since 2017. Previously, he was the director of the Estonian Foreign Policy Institute and professor of Baltic Politics at the University of Tartu, Estonia. His research interests include populist radical right parties, memory politics, European foreign and security policy and cooperation and conflict in the Baltic Sea region. He has written books such as ‘The Radical Right in Interwar Estonia’ (2000) and ‘A History of the Baltic States’ (2018) with the latter translated into nine languages. He has also served as editor of the Journal of Baltic Studies and is currently the president of the Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies.


    Rev. Prof. Piotr Mazurkiewicz Rev. Prof. Piotr Mazurkiewicz

    Rev. Prof. Piotr Mazurkiewicz

    Piotr Mazurkiewicz is professor of political science and head of the Chair of Political Thought and Political Theory at the Institute of Political Science of the Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw. Since 2002, he is a member of the Academic Council of the Institute of Political Studies. In 2001–2008, he was a member of the board of the European Society for Research in Ethics ‘Societas Ethica’. In 2008–2012, he served as Secretary General of the Commission of the Bishops' Conferences of the European Community COMECE. In 2013–2014, he was an expert at the Pontifical Council for the Family. His research interests include: political philosophy, political ethics, Catholic social teaching, European integration, religion in public life, personal data protection and totalitarianism. He is the author of numerous publications, including: ‘The Church and Democracy’ (2001); ‘The Europeanization of Europe. Europe's cultural identity in the context of integration processes’ (2001); ‘Violence in politics’ (2006); ‘Europe as a kinder surprise’ (2017); ‘Two towers and a minaret. Essays on Catholic social doctrine’ (2017); ‘Totalitarianism in the Postmodern Age’ (2018).

    Markus Meckel Markus Meckel

    Markus Meckel

    Markus Meckel is a German politician (SPD) and was a member of the German Bundestag from 1990 to 2009. He grew up in the GDR, is a protestant pastor and has been a member of the opposition since the 1970s. From 1988 to 1990 he headed the Ecumenical Education and Meeting Centre of the Evangelical Church near Magdeburg. In 1989, he initiated the founding of the Social Democratic Party in the GDR and became its deputy chairman. He sat at the Central Round Table and, after free elections, was a parliamentary deputy and foreign minister (April-August 1990). He took part in the ‘2 + 4 Talks’ that led to German unification. He is the German chairman of the council of the SDPZ and chairman of the Federal Foundation for Reappraisal of Communism in Germany. Also, he is the winner of several German and European awards. From 2013 to 2016 he was President of the German War Grave Commission, an association tending to war graves. He was chairman of the Advisory Committee of the ENRS from 2015 until March 2019. [Photo: Emanuela Danielewicz]

    Prof. Ferenc Miszlivetz Prof. Ferenc Miszlivetz

    Prof. Ferenc Miszlivetz

    Ferenc Miszlivetz is a sociologist and political scientist as well as doctor of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He is the founder and director-general of the Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg and a Jean Monnet professor and head of the European Centre of Excellence in Kőszeg. His research interests include: democracy in theory and practice, civil society, citizenship, regional and European studies, East-Central European transition, globalisation and sustainability. He is an academic advisor at the Institute for Political Sciences at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. In 2012, he was a Deák Visiting Professor at Columbia University in New York. He is also the founder and director of the board of the Institute for Social and European Studies Foundation (a Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence) and holds a UNESCO Chair in Cultural Heritage and Sustainability in Kőszeg. Since 2012, he has served as president of the Social Sciences unit of the Hungarian UNESCO Committee. He was appointed as a university professor at the University of Pannonia. He has received numerous awards, including the Knight’s Cross of the Hungarian Republic (2005). His major works include ‘Illusions and Realities: The Metamorphosis of Civil Society in a New European Space; Közép-Európa a kapuk előtt’ (Central Europe ante Portas); ‘Az európai konstrukció’ (The European Construction); and (co-ed.) ‘Reframing Europe’s Future: Challenges and Failures of the European Construction’.

    Prof. Agnieszka Nogal Prof. Agnieszka Nogal

    Prof. Agnieszka Nogal

    Agnieszka Nogal is professor and head of the Political Philosophy Department (Faculty of Philosophy) at the University of Warsaw. Her research fields include: political culture, human rights, feminism and biopolitics. She has been involved in human rights research since 1994 and is the author of books and articles on the implementation of human rights in national legal systems, including ‘Human and Citizens Rights in a Globalized World’ (2016) and on the importance of political culture. She is one of the founders and joint-editors of the ‘Civitas Journal of Political Philosophy’, deeply involved in discussion on the formation of public opinions.


    Prof. Andrzej Nowak Prof. Andrzej Nowak

    Prof. Andrzej Nowak

    Andrzej Nowak is professor at the History Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the History Institute of Jagiellonian University. He was the founder and for 18 years editor-in-chief of the socio-cultural magazine Arcana. He is currently a member of the Presidential National Development Council, as well as of the Council of the Institute of National Remembrance. He is the author of numerous books, including his most recent publications ‘The First Western Betrayal: 1920 – the Forgotten Appeasement’ (2015) and ‘Metamorphoses of the Russian Empire (1721–1921)’ (in Polish, 2018). His main research areas are: Eastern European cultural and political history and thought in the 19th and 20th centuries; political philosophy; international political relations; modern mass media and Polish-Russian relations. He is a member of the ENRS Academic Council.

    Prof. Anthony O'Hear Prof. Anthony O'Hear

    Prof. Anthony O'Hear

    Anthony O’Hear is a professor of philosophy at the University of Buckingham. He was the director of the Royal Institute of Philosophy from 1994 to 2019 and editor of the journal Philosophy in 1995–2019. He is the author of many books and articles on philosophy, including ‘Karl Popper’ (1980); ‘Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation’ (1995); and ‘Philosophy in the New Century’ (2001). With Natasha O'Hear, he is co-author of ‘Picturing the Apocalypse: the Book of Revelation in the Arts over Two Millennia’ (2015), which won the ACE-Mercers Award for 2017 for best book internationally on art and religion. Over the years, he has acted as a governmental advisor on education in Britain. He was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the British New Year's Honours List for 2018.


    Prof. Richard Overy Prof. Richard Overy

    Prof. Richard Overy

    Richard Overy is professor of history at the University of Exeter. He specialises in the history of the Second World War, air power history, and the history of European dictatorships. He has published more than 30 books, including ‘Why the Allies Won’; ‘Russia's War’; ‘The Dictators’ (winner of the 2004 Wolfson Prize); and ‘The Bombing War: Europe 1939–1945’. He is currently writing a global history of the Second World War to be published in 2020. He is a fellow of the British Academy and a member of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts.


    Prof. Martin Pekár Prof. Martin Pekár

    Prof. Martin Pekár

    Martin Pekár is a Slovak historian and academic teacher specialising in 20th-century Slovak history. In his work, he mainly focuses on the history of the Slovak Republic in 1939–1945, as well as on national minorities in Slovakia in the 20th century in a Central European perspective. Recently, he has been leading the EC H2020-MSCA project ‘History of European Urbanism in the 20th Century.’ Since 2012, he has headed the Department of History at the Faculty of Arts at the Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice. He is a member of the board of directors of the Slovak Nation’s Memory Institute. [Photo: Lukáš Katriňák]


    Prof. Andrejs Plakans Prof. Andrejs Plakans

    Prof. Andrejs Plakans

    Andrejs Plakans is Professor Emeritus (since 2006) of European History at Iowa State University in the USA. His most recent books are: ‘Experiencing Totalitarianism: The Invasion and Occupation of Latvia by the USSR and Nazi Germany 1939–1991: a Documentary History’ (2007); ‘A Concise History of the Baltic States’ (2011); a Russian-language edition of the same work, ‘Kratkaya istoriya stran Baltii’ (2016); and (with Aldis Purs) ‘Historical Dictionary of Latvia’ (2017).


    Prof. Adrian Pop Prof. Adrian Pop

    Prof. Adrian Pop

    Adrian Pop is professor of international relations at the Faculty of Political Sciences at the National University of Political Science and Public Administration in Bucharest. He holds a PhD in history from the Babeş-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca, a Diploma with Honours from the International Academy of Broadcasting in Montreux, and a MA in political science from Central European University in Budapest. He serves as Chair of the Romania Node of the Millennium Project. He is a former visiting fellow at the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, visiting Fulbright scholar at the University of Maryland, College Park, and international research fellow at the NATO Defence College in Rome. He is a member of various international professional associations and sits on the editorial boards of two scholarly journals. He has extensively published in the fields of Cold War history, history of historiography, international relations, geopolitics, and security and defence studies. He is also the author of a series of books with particular focus on the Black Sea region, East-Central and South-Eastern Europe, including: ‘The Fall of the Soviet Empire: ‘Lessons’ in Retrospect; The Origins and Typology of East European Revolutions’ (awarded the ‘George Bariţiu’ prize of the Romanian Academy in 2012).

    Prof. Arnold Suppan Prof. Arnold Suppan

    Prof. Arnold Suppan

    Arnold Suppan is a Professor Emeritus, born in 1945 in Carinthia. He received his PhD in 1970 at the University of Vienna. From 1971 to 2011 he was respectively assistant, associate and full professor of East European history at the University of Vienna and visiting professor at Leiden, Fribourg, Stanford, and Budapest. In 1988–2002, he headed the Austrian Institute of East and South-East European Studies and was Head of the Department for East European History at the University of Vienna from 2002 to 2008. He was associated with the Austrian Academy of Sciences/AAS, respectively serving as Chairman of the Historical Commission (2003–2011), Secretary General (2009–2011) and Vice President (2011–2013). He is an honorary member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and has published numerous articles and books with his latest publication being ‘Hitler-Beneš-Tito. Konflikt, Krieg und Völkermord in Ostmittel- und Südosteuropa’ (2014). He has been awarded numerous prizes, including the Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art (2001).

    Prof. Andrzej Szczerski Prof. Andrzej Szczerski

    Prof. Andrzej Szczerski

    Andrzej Szczerski is a professor, art historian, lecturer at the Institute of the History of Art at Jagiellonian University in Krakow. He also taught at Goethe University in Frankfurt and at St. Andrews University. He has authored publications on 19th and 20th century art and contemporary art and curated exhibitions, including ‘Symbolism in Poland and Britain’ at Tate Britain in London (2009), ‘The Power of Fantasy. Modern and Contemporary Art from Poland’ at the BOZAR Centre for Fine Arts in Brussels (2011) and ‘#dziedzictwo’ at the National Museum in Krakow (2017–2018). His most recent book ‘Transformation. Art in East-Central Europe after 1989’ was published in 2018.


    Dr Oldřich Tůma Dr Oldřich Tůma

    Dr Oldřich Tůma

    Oldřich Tůma is a senior research fellow at the Institute of Contemporary History of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, formerly (1998–2017) director of the Institute. His original research focus was medieval and Byzantine history. Since the early 1990s, his research has focused on the modern history of Czechoslovakia and Central Europe and the history of the Cold War. He is an observer member of the ENRS Academic Council.


    Prof. Jay Winter Prof. Jay Winter

    Prof. Jay Winter

    Jay M. Winter is Charles J. Stille Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Honorary Professor at the Australian National University. He is a founder of the Museum of the Great War in Péronne, France. In 1997, he received an Emmy award as co-producer of the eight-hour BBC/PBS television series ‘The Great War and the shaping of the twentieth century’. He is the author of ‘Sites of memory, sites of mourning: The Great War in European cultural history’ (1995); ‘War beyond words: Languages of remembrance from the Great War to the present’ (2017); and editor of the three-volume ‘Cambridge History of the First World War’ (2014). He has received honorary doctorates from the University of Graz in 2010, the Catholic University of Leuven in 2014, and the University of Paris in 2015. In 2017, he received the Victor Adler prize of the Austrian state for a lifetime’s work in history.

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